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Montgomery Museum of Fine Art

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Category: General

Sunday Puzzle – Star Puzzle

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Nora Ezell’s bursting with color Star Puzzle quilt.

Last Week’s Puzzle

Frederick Warren Freer’s wistful Lady in Blue

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

    • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
    • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
    • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
    • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (36 Pieces)

Medium (100 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (289 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Nora Ezell (American, 1919–2007), Star Puzzle, 2001, cotton and cotton/polyester blend, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Association Purchase, 2008.9.2

Sunday Puzzle – Lady in Blue

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Frederick Warren Freer’s wistful Lady in Blue.

Last Week’s Puzzle

Edward Hicks’s bucolic Peaceable Kingdom

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (36 Pieces)

Medium (100 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Frederick Warren Freer (American, 1849–1908), Lady in Blue, date unknown, watercolor on paper, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of Mrs. Margaret Freer, 1936.71

MMFA Responds

Dear Museum + Montgomery Community:

In mid-March, we reached out with our concerns for the community’s wellbeing as the public health crisis began to emerge. Today, we reach out again with concern for the community—this time in the wake of the demonstrations in our nation, state, and city protesting the senseless death of George Floyd and far too many others.

Just as COVID-19 has required us to take comprehensive measures to ensure everyone’s health and safety as we prepare to welcome you back, these persistent and painful issues and incidents of inequity call us to rethink and recraft the ways we engage with you at the Museum and in our community. Know that we approach this work with equal resolve and rigor.

American philosopher and activist Cornel West charges us to “never forget that justice is what love looks like in public.” We will turn to the transformative power of the arts as we redouble our intentions and actions to seek just such justice. We have a sense of what our next few steps might be and trust that you—our fellow Montgomerians, our creative companions—will join us in community as we continue on that path toward a more just and beautiful walk for all.

In peace and with love—

Your Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts

Exhibitions

Personal to Political: Celebrating the African-American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press

May 22 through July 26, 2020

The artists of Personal to Political capture the many personal narratives and political battles of African American artists across the country, reflecting a collective experience expressed in uniquely individual ways. Read More

Collection

Souls Grown Deep Acquisition

During the summer of 2019, the Museum is celebrated the addition of five works by contemporary African American artists from Alabama to its permanent collection. The pieces are a part of the Atlanta-based Souls Grown Deep Foundation William S. Arnett Collection and include a major work by Thornton Dial, Sr.; an early work by Jimmy Lee Sudduth; and three quilts made by Gee’s Bend quiltmakers Minnie Sue Coleman, Emma Mae Hall Pettway, and Joanna Pettway. Read More

Programs

Artists+Activism: Let’s Talk

Saturday, June 6 at 3:30 PM

More than just a vehicle of aesthetic beauty, art has the power to evoke emotion and invoke contemplation. Artists+Activism brings artists and community members together to do just that: share ideas and consider the feelings of others. Read More

Creative Conversations: Personal to Political

Wednesday, June 17 at 5:30 PM
Wednesday, July 8 at 5:30 PM

Creative Conversations brings together MMFA staff, artists, and members of our community and beyond in a casual setting to discuss their work, reflect on the Museum’s collection and exhibitions, and dialogue about current issues. We encourage you to tune in live, ask questions, and engage creatively from the comfort of your own homes. Read More

Home Studio: Honoring Juneteenth

Juneteenth is the oldest celebration of the end of slavery in our nation. This project invites you to use art not only as a celebratory outlet but also as an educational tool by creating an original work of art that reflects why Juneteenth should be honored and celebrated. Read More

Art of the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery

Saturday, July 18; 10 AM

Madeline Burkhardt of the Rosa Parks Museum, Dorothy Walker of the Freedom Rides Museum, Artist Bill Ford, and Curator of Education Alice Novak will discuss artists’ representation of the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery. The conversation will focus on works held by our partners’ institutions including representations of Rosa Park’s participation in the Bus Boycott (1955), the Freedom Rides (1961), and Bill Ford’s murals at the Bertha P. Williams Library, which commemorate the Selma to Montgomery March (1965).

This event will be held on Facebook Live.

Recommendations

Book Recommendations

Amid the significant movement of our nation and in efforts to lift Black voices, our June book recommendations address and highlight the lack of Black representation in the art world, underline how systematic racism has contributed to this and other injustices for Black Americans, and offer insights on how art can contribute to much-needed change. Read More

Film Recommendations

We’ve chosen to spotlight films that both challenge our own entrenched ways of thinking, as a people and society, and celebrate Black artists, heritage, and culture in honor of Juneteenth. Read More

Public Art: Protest + Justice

Please join us in exploring art related to protest and racial justice located downtown and in West Montgomery. This post features works grounded in key historical moments—such as the one we are living in—including public art and works on display in partner organizations. Read More

Sunday Puzzle – Peaceable Kingdom

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Edward Hicks’s bucolic Peaceable Kingdom.

Last Week’s Puzzle

Ford Crull’s dazzling In the Realm of the Fantastic

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (35 Pieces)

Medium (99 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Edward Hicks (American, 1780–1849), Peaceable Kingdom, ca. 1830–1832, oil on canvas, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, The Blount Collection, 1989.2.18

Public Art: Protest + Justice

Please join us in exploring art related to protest and racial justice located downtown and in West Montgomery. This post features works grounded in key historical moments—such as the one we are living in—including public art and works on display in partner organizations.

Lynching in the United States, 1877–1950

National Memorial for Peace and Justice*

417 Caroline St.

Image courtesy National Memorial for Peace and Justice

With additional works of art related to slavery, the bus boycott, and the justice system

*Learn about visiting

Bus Boycott, 1955

Court Square

Clydetta Fulmer’s statue of Rosa Parks boarding the bus

Rosa Parks Library and Museum*

252 Montgomery St.

Image courtesy Rosa Parks Museum

Artis Lane’s bust of Rosa Parks

Image courtesy Rosa Parks Museum

Erik Blome’s statue of Rosa on the bus

*Learn about visiting

Freedom Rides, 1961

Freedom Rides Museum

210 S. Court St.

Image courtesy the Alabama Historical Commission

Nora Ezell, Freedom Riders May, 1961

*Learn about visiting

Related to Selma to Montgomery March, 1965

St. Jude

2048 W. Fairview Ave.

Barrett Bailey and Jon Cook’s statue of Voting Rights Marchers

Timothy Schmalz’s Homeless Jesus/Jesus the Homeless

MMFA’s youth murals Remembering the March (located behind St. Jude)

Click here to learn about the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail.

Mount Zion AME Zion Church

657 Holt St.

Cottage Hill Roundabout at Goldthwaite Street

Barrett Bailey and Jon Cook’s statue of Voting Rights Marchers

Montgomery St. facing Lee St.

Sunny Paulk’s Selma to Montgomery March mural

Legacy of King/Civil Rights Movement in Alabama

South Perry St. and Washington Ave.

The dream catcher portrait of King

RSA Pavilion Park

361 Monroe St.

Lawrence Godwin’s relief about the Civil Rights Movement

King Memorial Dexter Avenue Baptist Church*

454 Dexter Ave.

Image courtesy Montgomery Advertiser

John Feagin’s mural

*Learn about visiting

Civil Rights Memorial Center

400 Washington Ave.

Image courtesy Tolerance.org, SPLC

Maya Lin Civil Rights Memorial

*Learn about visiting

National Center for the Study of Civil Rights and African American Culture at Alabama State University

1345 Carter Hill Rd.

Civil Rights murals designed by John Feagin

Rufus A King Library

3095 Mobile Highway

Bill Ford’s Civil Rights murals

Today

Court Square

Image courtesy Montgomery Advertiser

Juneteenth Art on the Square Project created by I Am More Than, King’s Canvas, and 21 Dreams, 2020

Related Events

Down Yonder, I Heard Somebody Calling my Name

On view at the Rosa Parks Museum beginning June 25, 2020
Learn More

 


 

Art of the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery

Saturday, July 18; 10 AM

Madeline Burkhardt of the Rosa Parks Museum, Dorothy Walker of the Freedom Rides Museum, Artist Bill Ford, and Curator of Education Alice Novak will discuss artists’ representation of the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery. The conversation will focus on works held by our partners’ institutions including representations of Rosa Park’s participation in the Bus Boycott (1955), the Freedom Rides (1961), and Bill Ford’s murals at the Bertha P. Williams Library, which commemorate the Selma to Montgomery March (1965).

This event will be held on Facebook Live.

Sunday Puzzle – In the Realm of the Fantastic

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Ford Crull’s dazzling In the Realm of the Fantastic.

Last Week’s Puzzle

Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s texture-rich Untitled (Two-Story Log Cabin)

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (35 Pieces)

Medium (99 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Ford Crull (American, born 1952), In the Realm of the Fantastic, 1999, oil, wax, and oil stick on canvas, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Association Purchase, 2000.7

Sunday Puzzle – Untitled (Two-Story Log Cabin)

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s texture-rich Untitled (Two-Story Log Cabin)

Last Week’s Puzzle

John Kelly Fitzpatrick’s dreamy Parisian book shop.

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (36 Pieces)

Medium (100 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Jimmy Lee Sudduth (American, 1910–2007), Untitled (Two-Story Log Cabin), ca. 1975, house paint and earth pigments on plywood, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of Georgine and Jack Clarke, 2004.17.2

Creative Conversations

Creative Conversations brings together MMFA staff, artists, and members of our community and beyond in a casual setting to discuss their work, reflect on the Museum’s collection and exhibitions, and dialogue about current issues. We encourage you to tune in live, ask questions, and engage creatively from the comfort of your own homes.

Personal to Political, Part I

MMFA curator Dr. Jennifer Jankauskas and Alabama artists Lynthia Edwards and Milton Madison in an engaging conversation about their work, their thoughts on the Museum’s current exhibition Personal to Political, and their answers to questions from the audience.

About the Participants

Dr. Jennifer Jankauskas is a Curator of Art at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts. She has recently curated the exhibitions About Face: Contemporary Ceramic Sculpture (2019) and Uncommon Territory: Contemporary Art in Alabama (2018).

Lynthia Edwards is based in Pinson, Alabama. She is inspired by the seemingly ordinary existence of black girls raised in the South.

Milton Madison is based in Deatsville, Alabama. His work celebrates the constant evolution of Black culture and how life and art imitate each other.

About the Exhibition

Personal to Political: Celebrating the African American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press features works by African American artists who have helped to shape the contemporary art conversation throughout the US. Presenting a wide range of prints, paintings, quilts, and sculptures, the works include an array of abstract and formal imagery depicting narratives that speak to personal experiences and political perspectives. At the heart of this show is Paulson Fontaine Press, a print studio that over the past two decades has developed an unparalleled roster of internationally-celebrated artists including Martin Puryear, Kerry James Marshall, and the Gee’s Bend Quilters.

Personal to Political: Celebrating the African-American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press was organized by Carrie Lederer, Curator of Exhibitions, Bedford Gallery, Lesher Center for the Arts, Walnut Creek, CA

Personal to Political, Part II

Wednesday, July 8 at 5:30 PM
Facebook Live; Follow the Museum on Facebook

At the end of the day, take a moment and join the MMFA’s Cassandra Cavness as she connects via Facebook live with two artists from the Museum’s current exhibition Personal to Political. Artists Radcliffe Bailey and Lava Thomas will discuss their work, the themes of the exhibition, and the widespread peaceful protests and turmoil surrounding current events.

To submit a question in advance of the livestream, click here.

About the Participants

Cassandra Cavness recently joined the Museum’s development team after working at Alabama State University. Among other aspects of her job, Cassandra strives to develop initiatives that foster conversations and engage communities in their history.

Radcliffe Bailey is based in Atlanta, Georgia. He works in layers, incorporating items from his own past and reflections on race, memory, and migration.

Lava Thomas is based in Berkeley, California. She explores various aspects of identity, including gender, race, and individuality, through varied media and expressions.

About the Exhibition

Personal to Political: Celebrating the African American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press features works by African American artists who have helped to shape the contemporary art conversation throughout the US. Presenting a wide range of prints, paintings, quilts, and sculptures, the works include an array of abstract and formal imagery depicting narratives that speak to personal experiences and political perspectives. At the heart of this show is Paulson Fontaine Press, a print studio that over the past two decades has developed an unparalleled roster of internationally-celebrated artists including Martin Puryear, Kerry James Marshall, and the Gee’s Bend Quilters.

Personal to Political: Celebrating the African-American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press was organized by Carrie Lederer, Curator of Exhibitions, Bedford Gallery, Lesher Center for the Arts, Walnut Creek, CA

MMFA Responds

Dear Museum + Montgomery Community:

In mid-March, we reached out with our concerns for the community’s wellbeing as the public health crisis began to emerge. Today, we reach out again with concern for the community—this time in the wake of the demonstrations in our nation, state, and city protesting the senseless death of George Floyd and far too many others.

Just as COVID-19 has required us to take comprehensive measures to ensure everyone’s health and safety as we prepare to welcome you back, these persistent and painful issues and incidents of inequity call us to rethink and recraft the ways we engage with you at the Museum and in our community. Know that we approach this work with equal resolve and rigor.

American philosopher and activist Cornel West charges us to “never forget that justice is what love looks like in public.” We will turn to the transformative power of the arts as we redouble our intentions and actions to seek just such justice. We have a sense of what our next few steps might be and trust that you—our fellow Montgomerians, our creative companions—will join us in community as we continue on that path toward a more just and beautiful walk for all.

In peace and with love—

Your Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts

Exhibitions

Personal to Political: Celebrating the African-American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press

May 22 through July 26, 2020

The artists of Personal to Political capture the many personal narratives and political battles of African American artists across the country, reflecting a collective experience expressed in uniquely individual ways. Read More

Collection

Souls Grown Deep Acquisition

During the summer of 2019, the Museum celebrated the addition of five works by contemporary African American artists from Alabama to its permanent collection. The pieces are a part of the Atlanta-based Souls Grown Deep Foundation William S. Arnett Collection and include a major work by Thornton Dial, Sr.; an early work by Jimmy Lee Sudduth; and three quilts made by Gee’s Bend quiltmakers Minnie Sue Coleman, Emma Mae Hall Pettway, and Joanna Pettway. Read More

Programs

Artists+Activism: Let’s Talk

Saturday, June 6 at 3:30 PM

More than just a vehicle of aesthetic beauty, art has the power to evoke emotion and invoke contemplation. Artists+Activism brings artists and community members together to do just that: share ideas and consider the feelings of others. Read More

Creative Conversations: Personal to Political

Wednesday, June 17 at 5:30 PM
Wednesday, July 8 at 5:30 PM

Creative Conversations brings together MMFA staff, artists, and members of our community and beyond in a casual setting to discuss their work, reflect on the Museum’s collection and exhibitions, and dialogue about current issues. We encourage you to tune in live, ask questions, and engage creatively from the comfort of your own homes. Read More

Home Studio

Check back soon.

Art of the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery

Saturday, July 18; 10 AM

A Conversation with the Rosa Parks Museum, Freedom Rides Museum, and artist Bill Ford to be held on Facebook Live.

Recommendations

Book Recommendations

Amid the significant movement of our nation and in efforts to lift Black voices, our June book recommendations address and highlight the lack of Black representation in the art world, underline how systematic racism has contributed to this and other injustices for Black Americans, and offer insights on how art can contribute to much-needed change. Read More

Film Recommendations

We’ve chosen to spotlight films that both challenge our own entrenched ways of thinking, as a people and society, and celebrate Black artists, heritage, and culture in honor of Juneteenth. Read More

Public Art: Protest + Justice

Please join us in exploring art related to protest and racial justice located downtown and in West Montgomery. This post features works grounded in key historical moments—such as the one we are living in—including public art and works on display in partner organizations. Read More

Artists+Activism: Let’s Talk

Yvonne Wells (American, born 1939), “Yesterday: Civil Rights in the South III,” 1989, cotton, cotton/polyester blend, wool, polyester, and plastic buttons, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of Kempf Hogan, 2004.20.8

More than just a vehicle of aesthetic beauty, art has the power to evoke emotion and invoke contemplation. Artists+Activism brings artists and community members together to do just that: share ideas and consider the feelings of others. A look back through history shows how art has a place at the front lines of movements for change; the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts invites you to tune in for these conversations about expressions and changes happening today.

Join our conversation. Art is now.

Upcoming Sessions

To be announced

Follow the Museum on Facebook

Video

Originally aired on Saturday, June 6 on Facebook Live. Hosted by MMFA educator Laura Bocquin and featuring Montgomery and River Region artists Madison Faile, Tori Jackson, Kevin King, Milton Madison, and Tara Sartorius.

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