Closed today

Montgomery Museum of Fine Art

Click to view hours
Closed today
22
Click to view calendar

Blog

A Fresh Look at our Studio Glass Collection

In March of 1962, a seismic shift occurred in the creation of art glass with a workshop led by American glass artists Harvey Littleton (1922–2013) and Dominick Labino (1910–1987) at the Toledo Museum of Art. During this workshop, they introduced advances in technology that enabled glass artists to work independently on a smaller scale instead of requiring the assistance of skilled teams of workers in a factory setting. This allowed individual artists to work in innovative ways and launched the American Studio Glass movement. Since that time, Studio Glass has continued to flourish, particularly in the American Northwest.

For the last 25 years, the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts has collected and interpreted art created by studio glass makers. Our collection began with the acquisition of an exquisite vessel by Sonja Blomdahl (American, born 1952) and in 2007 we organized a comprehensive exhibition of her work. Several other pieces also entered the collection through exhibitions organized by the Museum including sculptural glass by Stephen Rolfe Powell (American, born 1951), Ginny Ruffner (American, born 1952), Cappy Thompson (American, born 1952), and most recently, Lino Tagliapietra (Italian, born 1934). We continue to seek out works by masters of glass to provide a full picture of the Studio Glass movement, adding important acquisitions such as Orange Triple Movement (pictured above), 1983, by Harvey Littleton, the man internationally recognized as the “Father of the Studio Glass movement.” His inventive and elegant layers of flowing color and light in glass joins equally innovative and breathtaking works by other influential artists such as Dale Chihuly (American, born 1941), Joey Kirkpatrick and Flora Mace (American, born 1952 and 1949), and Dante Marioni (American, born 1964), among others.

The Museum’s collection illustrates the breadth and depth of the changing landscape of art glass, showcasing the creativity and vision of the many artists working with this challenging material. With the reinstallation of its collection, we hope to bring attention and appreciation to the accomplishments of the leading artists involved in the Studio Glass movement.

 

Harvey K. Littleton (American, 1922–2013), Orange Triple Movement, 1983, from the series Topological Geometry, free-blown glass, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Association Purchase, Decorative Arts Fund, 2014.2.2

A Gift that Sparks the Imagination

The Museum is thrilled to introduce its latest permanent installation in the John and Joyce Caddell Sculpture Garden to the River Region. The Children’s Gate (2019) is a gift of the City of Montgomery in honor of the Montgomery art community.

This brightly-colored work of art was crafted by Montgomery-based artist Vincent Buwalda (American, born 1965). Situated between the Sculpture Garden and the Education Courtyard, the Gate consists of playful robots welded from steel. Buwalda’s inventive design will spark the imagination of people of all ages, encouraging all who enter the Education Courtyard to unleash their own creativity.

Mayor Todd Strange and the Museum initiated the commission to celebrate local artists with the permanent placement of a work of art in the Garden. The Sculpture Garden Committee unanimously selected Buwalda’s design from the call for proposals put forth by the Museum and the Montgomery Business Committee on the Arts.

On Thursday, June 6, Mayor Todd Strange and the Museum’s Director Angie Dodson presented the Gate to local children, Museum supporters, the Sculpture Garden Committee, the Montgomery Business Committee on the Arts, and members of the media.

Vincent Buwalda, (American, born 1965), The Children’s Gate, 2019, urethane paint on welded steel, Gift of the City of Montgomery, Todd Strange, Mayor, 2019.6

Yvonne Wells – 2019 Governor’s Arts Award Recipient

The Museum wishes to celebrate artist Yvonne Wells (American, born 1939), a recipient of the 2019 Governor’s Arts Award from the Alabama State Council on the Arts.

A Tuscaloosa native, Wells began quilting in 1979. Initially, she created quilts to keep her and her children warm during the cold winter by following patterns from a book. Sewing based on patterns felt unsatisfying, and in 1984, Wells began creating story quilts. A quiet and humble woman, she speaks both eloquently and powerfully through visual narratives that illustrate personal experiences as well as religious or sociopolitical issues. She has said, “Everything I create is like a story, a record of history to benefit people in the future.”

For example, in Yesterday: Civil Rights in the South III on view now at the Museum, Wells’ imagery serves to illuminate many difficult moments from the era, including the bombing of Birmingham’s 16th Street Baptist Church that killed four little girls, Governor George Wallace standing in the schoolhouse door in an attempt to stop integration at The University of Alabama, and various acts of violence such as lynching and attacks on protestors with dogs and water hoses. Wells did not focus solely on the struggles of that period; she also depicted joyous celebrations and the hopeful changes that time has brought while honoring heroes of the movement such as Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Among her many achievements, Wells created an ornament for the Christmas tree at the White House in 1993, and she received the Alabama Arts and Visual Craftsman Award in 1998. The Museum holds 18 of Wells’ exuberant and sophisticated quilts in our Permanent Collection, and we presented solo exhibitions of her work in 1996 and 2013. In addition to the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, her work is included in national and international museums and private collections.

Congratulations to Yvonne Wells on receiving this well-deserved honor!

Credit: Yvonne Wells (American, born 1939), Yesterday: Civil Rights in the South III, 1989, Cotton, cotton/polyester blend, wool, polyester, and plastic buttons, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of Kempf Hogan, 2004.20.8

Stephen Rolfe Powell (1951–2019)

The Museum wishes to honor the memory of Stephen Rolfe Powell, a luminary in the field of studio art glass and a friend of the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, who passed away on Saturday, March 16, 2019.

Originally from Birmingham, Alabama, Powell spent his undergraduate years studying painting and ceramics at Center College in Danville, Kentucky. While continuing to pursue ceramics in graduate school at Louisiana State, he found his passion in the excitement of glass and never looked back.

Since that time, Powell became internationally recognized for his innovative glass sculptures. A master with murine, he blew and stretched glass into suggestive, asymmetrical shapes, that along with his inventive method of swinging and torching the molten glass, offered a fresh departure from conventional vessels. His eccentric sculptural pieces, often sporting tongue-in-cheek titles, are dazzling imaginative works that pop and sizzle with rich color.

Known for his humor and exuberance, along with his grace and generosity, Powell was an unofficial ambassador for glass art and studio glass artists. Equally important to creating his own work, Powell relished his role as a professor, inspiring many students throughout the years at the glass program he founded at Centre College.

Learn More

From Our Collection

Artist Biography
Objects by the Artist

Exhibition

Psychedelic Mania: Stephen Rolfe Powell’s Dance with Glass

Museum Store

Catalogue – Psychedelic Mania: Stephen Rolfe Powell’s Dance with Glass
Publication — Stephen Rolfe Powell: Glassmaker

Gifts from Mark and Amy Johnson

In January of this year, the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts received as gifts three works of art that were part of the collection of the Museum’s Director Emeritus, Mark Johnson, and his wife, Amy Johnson (pictured above). Mark spent most of his 23 years as Director of the Museum strategizing the refinement and expansion of the Museum’s permanent collection. Much of this involved the Museum’s use of endowed funds to purchase American historical paintings and sculpture (thanks to the generous bequest of Ida Belle Young) or Old Master prints (equally generously funded through the Weil Print Endowment). While he enjoyed the excitement that went along with these searches and purchases, he was personally devoted to more modern works of art, and particularly Studio Art glass and contemporary ceramics. Mark made many friends among the artists in these media, and he valued them as people as well as the art that they made.

The first gift, an intricate and exuberant ceramic platter by Viola Frey, Halo of Possessions, 1994, is currently on view in the exhibition About Face: Contemporary Ceramic Sculpture. Frey (American, 1933–2004) had an incredible influence on the trajectory of figurative ceramics in this country. Her bold and colorful platters such as Halo of Possessions were inspired by found materials gathered from junkyards and flea markets. Casting these objects in clay, Frey assembled them into rich, expressionistic, textural platters that become tableaux of our cultural lives.

Also included in the gift are two sculptures in glass by Seattle-based artist Ginny Ruffner (American, born 1952) that showcase her exceptional creativity and lampworking skills: Learning to Cat Paddle, 1994, and A Not So Still Life, 2000. Ruffner’s works combine her skills as a painter with her training as a flame worker in glass. Her sophisticated, whimsical, and narrative sculptures function as a canvas for her thoughts and dreams as seen in Learning to Cat Paddle. Sharing its title with an award-winning, full-length documentary about Ruffner, A Not So Still Life was featured in the exhibition Creativity: The Flowering Tornado, which the Museum organized and toured in 2003.

The Museum family takes great pride in the work that Mark and Amy invested in the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts and in its success over his long tenure. We are tremendously grateful that they have entrusted these outstanding works of art that meant so much to them to our permanent collection.

Black History Month

In celebration of Black History Month, the Museum is featuring the following works that highlight African-American culture and history from its permanent collection. To browse the permanent collection, click here.

Works

Back Home from Up the Country (detail), 1969

Romare Bearden (American, 1911–1988)
Durr Fillauer Gallery

Back Home from Up the Country and In the Garden both relate to a larger thematic grouping of work, The Prevalence of Ritual, which was also the title of an important exhibition of Bearden’s art held at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1971. The series references Bearden’s memories of his youth, including many works that refer to his childhood home in rural Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. Both demonstrate his characteristic manner of working in collage to create flat, abstract designs that reference recognizable imagery such as the objects and human figures in both works.

View in collection

 


 

In the Garden (detail), 1974

Romare Bearden (American, 1911–1988)
Durr Fillauer Gallery

Back Home from Up the Country and In the Garden both relate to a larger thematic grouping of work, The Prevalence of Ritual, which was also the title of an important exhibition of Bearden’s art held at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1971. The series references Bearden’s memories of his youth, including many works that refer to his childhood home in rural Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. Both demonstrate his characteristic manner of working in collage to create flat, abstract designs that reference recognizable imagery such as the objects and human figures in both works.

View in collection

 


 

The Donkey Cart (detail), n.d.

Clementine Hunter (American, ca. 1886/87–1988)
Blount Galleries

Clementine Hunter was born in the Cane River district of Louisiana and worked for most of her life as a farm hand. Largely without a formal education, she spent her later years working at Melrose Plantation and began to paint by using materials left behind by a visiting artist. Her subjects are typically scenes of rural and agricultural life during the early 20th century, and they form a record of the daily life and activities of that era. The Donkey Cart is an example of her work in this genre, showing a simply composed scene of a field worker transporting cotton in a small wagon.

View in collection

 


 

Hiawatha’s Marriage (detail)

1868 Edmonia Lewis (American, 1844–1907)
Hudson Gallery

Edmonia Lewis was born to an African American father and a Native American mother of the Chippewa tribe in New York. In 1859 she enrolled at Oberlin College to study art and sculpture. She studied with sculptor Edward Brackett, who encouraged her to continue her training in Europe. Lewis produced several sculptural subjects related to her heritage inspired by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s 1855 popular poem, “The Song of Hiawatha.” This piece depicts the Ojibwa warrior Hiawatha wedding a daughter of the Dacotah tribe, Minnehaha, to seal a peace between those two nations.

View in collection

 


 

Self-Portrait: When the Left Side of the Brain Meets the Right Side of the Brain (detail), ca. 2006

Charlie Lucas (American, born 1951)
Rotunda

Artist Charlie Lucas originally worked in construction, but after a back injury, he started painting and sculpting as part of his recuperation. Lucas creates sculptures made out of welded metal found objects and scraps. He has had no formal training as an artist; instead, as a child, he learned crafts by watching relatives and tries to keep aspects of these traditions alive in his work. He currently lives in Selma, Alabama, and he has a dream of an interactive theme park where children could play among various kinds of art and could create art with their parents.

View in collection

 


 

Pig Pen Variation (detail), 1986

Mary Maxtion (American, 1924–2015)
Newman Gallery

Mary Maxtion of Boligee, Alabama, was one of the state’s most prolific and skillful quilt makers in the 20th century. Her multi-colored Pig Pen Variation is a version of a popular pattern also known as a House Top. In the pig pen pattern, a medallion of fabric is centered in rows of fabric extending vertically and horizontally, creating brilliant squares that seem to recede into space. Maxtion varied the colors of the strips to enhance that visual illusion by alternating colors that are warm (like red) with others that are cool (like blue).

View in collection

 


 

The Sweat of the Mule and the Sharecropper, n.d.

Joe Minter (American, born 1943)
Caddell Sculpture Garden

Sculptor Joe Minter is from Birmingham, Alabama, and creates his works primarily from discarded, rusted metal. Many of the materials Minter uses speak to his African American family’s roots and the obsolescence of old technology—a visual link to enslavement, for example in his use of plow points and rakes. The plow points and the worn metal shoes from a mule’s hooves hang from chains that allude to forced labor in times of slavery and later in the practices of sharecropping, as well as the “chain gangs” that were a practice in the penal system.

 


 

Untitled (detail), 1999

Clifton Pearson (American, born 1948)
Richard Gallery

Clifton Pearson is an Alabama artist living near Huntsville. His glazed stoneware objects are stylized figures that combine his imagination with reality. This chieftain leader from the Celebrated Figures series exemplifies Pearson’s approach of creating majestic figures from slabs of clay that embody dignity while reflecting various cultures, including African and Native American. Pearson hand-works each piece, highlighting rich textures and ornate headdresses, letting the personality and humanity of each figure evolve through the process.

View in collection

 


 

Rosa Parks I (detail), 2005

Yvonne Wells (American, born 1939)
Blount Galleries

Yvonne Wells is best known for her “narrative” quilts in which she uses the appliqué of hand- shaped fabric pieces sewn to a larger top to tell a story within her design. This image of Montgomery’s Rosa Parks, a pioneer within the Civil Rights Movement, includes references to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, segregated public facilities, and the struggle of Black Americans to guarantee their right to vote.

View in collection

Related Programs

Weekend Tours

Free docent-led tours are offered at 1 PM on Sunday, February 3 and Saturday, February 16. These tours are free and open to the public. No reservation required.

Caddell Sculpture Garden – Ribbon Cutting

On Tuesday, September 25, 2018, the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts officially opened the John and Joyce Caddell Sculpture Garden to the public. Transformed by season, time of day, and even weather, the Garden provides an ever-changing and contemplative haven to view works of art and to enjoy the natural beauty of our Park.

Learn more about the inaugural exhibition, Art in the Garden.

Video

Poetry of Glass

During our recent Poetry of Glass workshop, poet and Auburn professor Janelle Green introduced teens to ekphrasis writing inspired by the exhibition, Lino Tagliapietra: Master of Beauty. She prompted the teens to find three pieces in the exhibition, look at them and think about the musicality, the colors, and the movement in them. Once they did that, the teens were tasked with writing poems inspired by each piece but in different styles. They could rhyme or not. The poems could be long or short. Each different to challenge the teens and their writing.

Poems

Untitled

Elizabeth Efferson, age 17
Inspired by Clodia

Glass leaves, like water droplets.
Shattering when they meet the ground.


Father

Vivian Cunningham, age 18
Inspired by both Fenice glass pieces

A S and a C
The initials of a father
The initials of my father
The initials of someone strong
Someone loving
Kind
Cheerful
There
A S and a C
The initials of my father.


Tower

Kamaryn Ellison, age 17
Inspired by Spirale

A spiraling tower.
Is in the distance.
Stretching toward the sky.
It disappears into the clouds.
The heavens open and shower.
The traveler puts up resistance.
Carried on the wind is a yell of “Why.”
The trees everywhere are like a crowd.
In a cave the traveler cowers.
Still the tower is in an upright stance.
The traveler travels and at night arrives.
Having found true shelter the traveler is proud.


The Tempest

Jordan Scott, age 17
Inspired by London

And I was a child again, running by the sea,
I was laughing loudly, with my mother chasing me.
I can almost smell the air.
I can almost touch the sand.
I can almost feel my sister
As she took my hand.
Then I saw the storm,
I saw my calm destroyed
The waves crashed towards me violently
Then I felt a void.
I remember being scared at the suddenness of the storm.
It is a storm in a child’s eyes.
And all of the fears they form.


Crisp

Tamara Phillips, age 16
Inspired by Kuala

Lapis gemstones, bright and blue
Always remind me of you
Warm embraces, or pleasant surprises
You’re the sunsets to my sunrises
Rigid and cold,
Many fear you
But to me, your heart is clear to see through
Yes, you’ve caused plenty of trouble
And you’re not easy to get along with
Yet there’s not a way to find another
That could steal your show
And you should know,
That just like spring,
You’re quite a great thing
One of my favorite seasons of all
Just after fall


Places

Norah Willis, age 17
Inspired by Avventurine Installation

There’s people
There’s places
There’s towns
There’s faces

We move, we live, we breathe
We are in a way, an epiphany

Lines and borders dived our human lands
Though we are all not that different in the times of sands

We are all born
We all die
We have our lows
And we have our highs

We are all created the same,
Though we come in different shapes and sizes

In a lot of ways we are like a vase
One with many shapes

Love your quirks
Love other’s changes
Love your skin
Love other’s fazes

Accept change
Though it’s hard
But not accepting it
Will leave us scars

Be the clay
Change as your shaped
Love your crazy
And love those who are sane

Contemporary Conversations: Lino Tagliapietra

The Artist

Lino Tagliapietra is one of the greatest glass makers alive today. Growing up in Murano, Italy, and achieving the title of maestro (glass master) at the age of twenty, Tagliapietra is known around the world for his various achievements, not only in glass but in life as well. Due to the poor economy in Murano, many young boys and girls would turn to the glass factories as a way to earn for their families; hence, he began learning his craft at the early age of twelve. When asked to describe what life was like growing up in Murano, Lino begins to reminisce:

“[We have] the war in Spain, we have [the] war in Libya, and we have the war in Africa, and we lived with the war I remember. Then we have the second war…we have the Fascists…we have the Nazi. We have the Deutch (German) people, and then we have the American, English. So in Murano, we are surrounded in a sort of way. In one way we are protected, more than Venice. But still there we had somebody die. Somebody who the Nazis thought was a Jew, meaning they went to a camp…and never came back. And even still, living in Murano is a wonderful experience if you like it. [On] the island, we had 6,000 people [when I was growing up], now we have 6,000 people and maybe 7,000 workers. Many, many people. Now [we’ve gone] a little bit down. I think we are probably 5,000 people, but those 6,000 people had to work. They had very, very little money, much less. If you work…in the glass community, you would make maybe $400 – $800. Besides that, Murano is a wonderful island, I like the small island with [the] small village, [because] everybody knows you. We have created quite a few differences between Venice and ourselves because of the war. We have less pollution, it’s possible to play in the water, possible to go in the lagoon and catch the fish. We have a wonderful life, for some reason. We are poor. The shoes, we only have them sometimes, but we play without shoes. We don’t have a pool, but when we [were] kids they put us in the canal. I think there’s no place in the world like Murano, it’s so beautiful.”

For some, the culture shock between Italy and America would create a difficult challenge when adjusting to the lifestyle. For Tagliapietra, he feels his move to America was relatively easy:

“Because I have curiosity…I feel very comfortable in America. In the island, for example, if you aren’t a master, a good master – okay, not necessarily the top – but everybody thinks: ‘Good master, man!’, you know? So a ‘master’ is something ordinary in many ways and they sort of brush you aside. But in America, everybody respects you. They greet you in a very nice way and then you feel so comfortable, and then the American spirit is possible, trying everything you want. I like it because [once] I came to America I [no longer had to] do production, I [could] do what I [wanted] to do… It is a good feeling.”

The Process

Before starting any glassmaking project, one must be equipped with the proper team. Lino Tagliapietra’s team consists of about 25 people, both men, and women, who love glass. The youngest, according to Tagliapietra, has been working for “maybe 9 years,” but nobody would truly know as the group is constantly working together. Their teamwork boils down to their love of glass – their passion for the craft. Little is actually spoken during the process; instead, Tagliapietra and his team communicate with their hands and movements. When someone does speak, it means they are on the right track: simple words to keep everyone on the same page. Tagliapietra speaks very highly of his team of “wonderful glassblowers.” He finishes his statement on the relationship of his team by telling us, “it’s very important to have the right team. The team, for me, is about being surrounded by people who share the same love.” These words speak volumes, reminding us of how important community and teamwork truly is.

When asked if he could summarize the glass making process in a few sentences, we Muses received a chuckle from the maestro and a doubtful “I will try.” He began to summarize:

“Perhaps the most important part of the glass blowing process is having a clear picture of what you want to make: what form you want, how much color, designs with canes—colored ‘canes’ of glass—or without. There are many factors and decisions that need to be addressed before the glass blowing process even begins. After a clear picture has been envisioned, the next step is to start.”

Once Tagliapietra has chosen his design, the process is very simple; his knowledge of glass blowing makes the entire process look ridiculously easy.

As the maestro of glass blowing, we were all very interested to learn whether Mr. Tagliapietra had ever worked with other materials. His response—perhaps not too surprising to some—was that he has never strayed far from glass. He has dabbled in working with clay and admitted to liking the material, but it was “certainly not glass.” Most interestingly, Tagliapietra likes to cook. He says it is the only other “art” he works with well. His ultimate response was, “Normally, I am a very, very monoculture artist. I blow glass. I do not do anything else. Sometimes I do something, but it is best not to because I know glass and it is my profession.”

Taking a look around a room filled with Lino Tagliapietra’s work is breathtaking. Every piece has its own story to tell and each story possesses its own challenges. While Tagliapietra makes glassblowing look simple to the average person, he demonstrated that every piece of his work holds different levels of difficulty. “Just because a piece looks simple doesn’t mean it was easy,” he explained. When asked if he could pick his most complex work, Tagliapietra chose the Spirale. The Spirale is an oblong glass piece with a seemingly impossible helix design at its core. He proceeded to emphasize its complexity even more, explaining that he could not make a single mistake during the creative process. For instance, when blowing out the design, he could not afford to blow too much or too little; the result would have been disastrously out of proportion. Exactness, precision, and patience are key ingredients for any piece of his work.

Legacy

Our time with Lino Tagliapietra has come to an end. We learned much about both the artist and glassblowing itself through his profound words. But we still had one final question to ask: “What would you say to young people today who are interested in glass blowing but fear they won’t be successful?” Perhaps this was the best question to draw our time with the artist to a close.

“We have a lot of people, young people that want to blow glass, and they want to be successful as well. If you want to blow glass, you must love the material, and you must be very dedicated. Normally, that means you don’t do anything else; you must be open, and work every single day. The important thing is to love what you are doing and to have patience. Find very good teachers and good luck. You know, the material is so fantastic, but I’m probably lucky because the only thing I ever did was blow glass. There is a certain joy when you’re working with a material you love.”

Tagliapietra often reiterates how important art is to his life. Whether in naming a work of art after the places he loves, or taking inspiration from the world around him, he continuously lives, thinks, and breathes the love he has for his craft. He stands firmly in his conviction that art is not just something you do, but it is what you live. It requires dedication, patience, and hard work, but if you have a passion, pursue it to the fullest, and do not stop until it is yours. It is easy to see that he lives by those words prophetically.

Conservation: Untitled (Nymph), 1933

The John and Joyce Caddell Sculpture Garden gained its first permanent resident in October when Jessie Duncan Wiggin’s (1872–1954) Untitled (Nymph) took center stage at the top of the new Garden. While many of its current sculptural residents are intended to be temporary visitors, this lovely bronze dancer will be welcoming visitors to the Caddell Sculpture Garden for years to come.

The Nymph’s journey to the Garden began in New York in 1933. The more than six-foot tall figure was cast at the Roman Bronze Works in New York and depicts a mythological spirit of nature, who, as in this case, is generally shown in a celebratory dance. In mythology, nymphs were associated with locations such as woods, rivers, and streams.

Having already been exhibited outdoors for many years in Robert and Virginia Weil’s Montgomery garden, the sculpture’s surface needed to be cleaned and years of accumulated corrosion removed. It is corrosion of the metal that gives bronze exhibited outdoors a characteristic bright green color over the original patina. The Museum consulted with objects conservator, Michelle Savant of Atlanta for the project. A broken finger was repaired, the sculpture was cleaned, and finally, Savant waxed the surface, which will protect it from further deterioration. This process has returned the sculpture’s surface to its original bronze patina.

The Museum has placed Nymph on a limestone plinth at the top of the Garden, in front of a beautiful natural rock wall that defines the northern edge of the Caddell Sculpture Garden itself. As a garden sculpture in the classical tradition of mythological spirits of nature, Nymph represents a convention in Western art that goes back for many centuries: that of showing female figures as celebrations of nature and of the garden’s natural beauty.

Follow the Conservation Process

Conservator Michelle Savant began work on the sculpture Nymph by washing the bronze with a mild soap and using a low-abrasive pad to remove surface dirt and corrosion.

Once the work had been cleaned, the conservator applied wax to its surface to seal it and protect it from the elements. Garden Superintendent Jeff Dutton assisted by heating the surface with a heat gun, which kept the wax flowing to fill any tiny crevices in the surface.

Finally, once the wax had dried and hardened, the surface was buffed with a clean, lint-free fabric. The Museum staff will continue to apply wax as necessary to protect the work over time.

Older Posts: