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Month: June 2020

Sunday Puzzle – Lady in Blue

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Frederick Warren Freer’s wistful Lady in Blue.

Last Week’s Puzzle

Edward Hicks’s bucolic Peaceable Kingdom

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (36 Pieces)

Medium (100 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Frederick Warren Freer (American, 1849–1908), Lady in Blue, date unknown, watercolor on paper, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of Mrs. Margaret Freer, 1936.71

MMFA Responds

Dear Museum + Montgomery Community:

In mid-March, we reached out with our concerns for the community’s wellbeing as the public health crisis began to emerge. Today, we reach out again with concern for the community—this time in the wake of the demonstrations in our nation, state, and city protesting the senseless death of George Floyd and far too many others.

Just as COVID-19 has required us to take comprehensive measures to ensure everyone’s health and safety as we prepare to welcome you back, these persistent and painful issues and incidents of inequity call us to rethink and recraft the ways we engage with you at the Museum and in our community. Know that we approach this work with equal resolve and rigor.

American philosopher and activist Cornel West charges us to “never forget that justice is what love looks like in public.” We will turn to the transformative power of the arts as we redouble our intentions and actions to seek just such justice. We have a sense of what our next few steps might be and trust that you—our fellow Montgomerians, our creative companions—will join us in community as we continue on that path toward a more just and beautiful walk for all.

In peace and with love—

Your Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts

Exhibitions

Personal to Political: Celebrating the African-American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press

May 22 through July 26, 2020

The artists of Personal to Political capture the many personal narratives and political battles of African American artists across the country, reflecting a collective experience expressed in uniquely individual ways. Read More

Collection

Souls Grown Deep Acquisition

During the summer of 2019, the Museum is celebrated the addition of five works by contemporary African American artists from Alabama to its permanent collection. The pieces are a part of the Atlanta-based Souls Grown Deep Foundation William S. Arnett Collection and include a major work by Thornton Dial, Sr.; an early work by Jimmy Lee Sudduth; and three quilts made by Gee’s Bend quiltmakers Minnie Sue Coleman, Emma Mae Hall Pettway, and Joanna Pettway. Read More

Responding to the Moment – Community Insight

To hear how works by African-American artists in the Museum’s collection are speaking to our shared humanity and calls for equality at this moment in American history, we invited members of our community—artists, writers, students, teachers, advocates, leaders of arts programs and Civil Rights Museums—to share personal reflections on selected works of art. Read More

Programs

Artists+Activism: Let’s Talk

Saturday, June 6 at 3:30 PM

More than just a vehicle of aesthetic beauty, art has the power to evoke emotion and invoke contemplation. Artists+Activism brings artists and community members together to do just that: share ideas and consider the feelings of others. Read More

Creative Conversations: Personal to Political

Wednesday, June 17 at 5:30 PM
Wednesday, July 8 at 5:30 PM

Creative Conversations brings together MMFA staff, artists, and members of our community and beyond in a casual setting to discuss their work, reflect on the Museum’s collection and exhibitions, and dialogue about current issues. We encourage you to tune in live, ask questions, and engage creatively from the comfort of your own homes. Read More

Home Studio: Honoring Juneteenth

Juneteenth is the oldest celebration of the end of slavery in our nation. This project invites you to use art not only as a celebratory outlet but also as an educational tool by creating an original work of art that reflects why Juneteenth should be honored and celebrated. Read More

Art of the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery

Saturday, July 18; 10 AM

Madeline Burkhardt of the Rosa Parks Museum, Dorothy Walker of the Freedom Rides Museum, Artist Bill Ford, and Curator of Education Alice Novak will discuss artists’ representation of the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery. The conversation will focus on works held by our partners’ institutions including representations of Rosa Park’s participation in the Bus Boycott (1955), the Freedom Rides (1961), and Bill Ford’s murals at the Bertha P. Williams Library, which commemorate the Selma to Montgomery March (1965).

This event will be held on Facebook Live.

Recommendations

Book Recommendations

Amid the significant movement of our nation and in efforts to lift Black voices, our June book recommendations address and highlight the lack of Black representation in the art world, underline how systematic racism has contributed to this and other injustices for Black Americans, and offer insights on how art can contribute to much-needed change. Read More

Film Recommendations

We’ve chosen to spotlight films that both challenge our own entrenched ways of thinking, as a people and society, and celebrate Black artists, heritage, and culture in honor of Juneteenth. Read More

Public Art: Protest + Justice

Please join us in exploring art related to protest and racial justice located downtown and in West Montgomery. This post features works grounded in key historical moments—such as the one we are living in—including public art and works on display in partner organizations. Read More

Home Studio: Honoring Juneteenth

Juneteenth is the oldest celebration of the end of slavery in our nation. Traditionally celebrated on the third Sunday of June, this momentous occasion has been widely celebrated by African Americans since 1866 but it is only recently gaining broader recognition. For example, last Friday, Mayor Steven Reed issued a proclamation encouraging Alabamians to use Juneteenth as a day for remembrance and reconciliation. Through education and reflection, we are all learning to do better, to be better. For some of us, this takes the form of engaging in educational experiences in regards to respecting the history of African Americans and encouraging and providing the tools for those who want to move forward with more respect and mindfulness.

Objective

To use art not only as a celebratory outlet but also as an educational tool by creating an original work of art that reflects why Juneteenth should be honored and celebrated. If you are Black, you stand with strong wisdom of why Juneteenth is celebrated, and we invite you to express whatever it is you want through this project. If you are not Black, this is an opportunity to further educate yourself and your family, to reflect upon the African-American experience through your creation. Together we can all start repairing bridges that were long ago burned by racism.

Material Suggestions

Introduction

Begin by learning about Juneteenth—Why is it important to our nation’s history and why is it honored and celebrated? If you are doing this project as a family, talk about your discoveries, then use this discussion to prompt creative expressions.

Activity

Gather your chosen art supplies, then use what you’ve learned (or what you already know) to create an inspired work of art! This can take the form of a painting, drawing, or even a mixed-media collage. Use whatever you have to express your ideas and feelings.

If a prompt is needed to create, one idea is to write down the following phrase: “I celebrate Juneteenth because…”  or “I honor Juneteenth by…” then complete your sentence by either writing personal thoughts or using images that visually communicate your ideas.

Conclusion

Discuss your original creations as a group (as few or many as that may safely be!), sharing about why you honor Juneteenth, or what you’ve learned through participating in this project.

Submit Your Work

We would love to see your creations! Share your work with us by taking a photograph and emailing it to us at pr@mmfa.org.

Sunday Puzzle – Peaceable Kingdom

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Edward Hicks’s bucolic Peaceable Kingdom.

Last Week’s Puzzle

Ford Crull’s dazzling In the Realm of the Fantastic

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (35 Pieces)

Medium (99 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Edward Hicks (American, 1780–1849), Peaceable Kingdom, ca. 1830–1832, oil on canvas, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, The Blount Collection, 1989.2.18

Book Recommendations – June 2020

Amid the significant movement of our nation and in efforts to lift Black voices, our June book recommendations address and highlight the lack of Black representation in the art world, underline how systematic racism has contributed to this and other injustices for Black Americans, and offer insights on how art can contribute to much-needed change.

Click here to browse May’s recommendations.

About Ekphrasis

The Museum’s reading group is expanding! ​All individuals are invited to join Ekphrasis regardless of Museum membership. If you would like to join Ekphrasis, please complete ​the form​ below​.

Membership Form

Vote for 2020–2021 Reading Selections

If you have​ any questions, please contact Brandy Morrison at bmorrison@mmfa.org.

Related Program

This Is What I Know About Art Discussion [via Zoom]
Wednesday, August 12; Noon

More details to come.

Art and Upheaval

Book

Art and Upheaval: Artists on the World’s Frontlines

Author

William Cleveland

Why You Should Read

“This beautifully written book reads like a collection of stories from voices across the world, woven together to exemplify the power of art as a tool for activism. It helps us understand that activist art isn’t just a thing in countries often thought of as being in peril, and art for change isn’t limited to visual arts. Art and Upheaval sheds light on stories from Australia, South Africa, the United States, Serbia, and more, and lifts up voices of artists who create with purpose through visual, performance, and language arts. Art is a universal language; even when words can’t be understood, creative expressions speak loud and clear.” – Laura Bocquin, MMFA Assistant Curator of Education

Where to Purchase

Physical: Amazon, Bookshop | Digital: Kindle

Related Content

Artists+Actvisim: Let’s Talk

Exhibiting Blackness

Book

Exhibiting Blackness: African Americans and the American Art Museum

Author

Bridget R. Cooks

Why She Wrote It

“Visiting and working in mainstream museums, I found the regular omission of art on view that had been created by African American artists. When there was an art exhibition of their work, I noticed a few other things: First, African American artists were featured in museums within group exhibitions about Black identity. They were not regularly shown in thematic-based exhibitions organized around a style of art or specific topic. And rarely was their work shown alongside artists who were not Black; Second, the object labels for art by African American artists stated that the artists were Black, however, labels for art by White artists did not identify them as White. Third, when an exhibition of works by African American artists was on view, the majority of White museum visitors who commented to me about the exhibition stated that they had never seen art by an African American artist before. They believed that the exhibition was the first of its kind, and they wanted to know more.

What most people did not know was that there have been African American artists for hundreds of years. There has also been a history of White supremacy in museums since their origins in the nineteenth century. I wanted to create a well-researched text and critical analysis that would make the history of African Americans and art museums accessible. My hope was for American art museums and art critics to do better work in the future.” – Bridget R. Cooks

Where to Purchase

Physical: Amazon, Bookshop

Related Content

Interview with Bridget Cooks, UC Irvine

This Is What I Know About Art

Book

This Is What I Know About Art

Author

Kimberly Drew

Why You Should Read

“This book delves into the hidden (or not so hidden) obstacles that minorities face when trying to enter the art realm. In this book, Drew exposes the realities of Black professionals entering the art world–the wage disparities, the lack of opportunities, the absence of Black artists in a variety of appropriate spaces, the burden of dealing with white guilt. She also discusses why and how Black people do not engage with art and museums in the same way. Through this work, the reader becomes enlightened and empowered, something that is greatly needed in today’s world.” – Cassandra Cavness, MMFA Development Assistant

Where to Purchase

Physical: Amazon, Bookshop | Digital: Apple Books, Kindle | Audiobook: Apple Books, Audible

Related Content

Kimberly Drew’s Instagram

Related Program

Book Discussion [via Zoom]
Wednesday, August 12; Noon

More details to come.

White Fragility

Book

White Fragility: Why is it so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism?

Author

Robin DiAngelo

Why You Should Read

“It’s an excellent read. She gives thorough and diverse examples of racism in society. The book addresses many issues including white supremacy and how all people can work together to engage more constructively. I read it in two days!

As for how it applies to the art world? I think it will give everyone a different perspective on why black artists and their artwork are crucial and should be represented in museums and galleries.” – Cynthia Milledge, MMFA Director of Marketing and Public Relations

Where to Purchase

Physical: Amazon, Bookshop | Digital: Apple Books, Kindle | Audiobook: Apple Books, Audible

Related Content

‘Interrupt The Systems’: Robin DiAngelo On ‘White Fragility’ And Anti-Racism

Public Art: Protest + Justice

Please join us in exploring art related to protest and racial justice located downtown and in West Montgomery. This post features works grounded in key historical moments—such as the one we are living in—including public art and works on display in partner organizations.

Lynching in the United States, 1877–1950

National Memorial for Peace and Justice*

417 Caroline St.

Image courtesy National Memorial for Peace and Justice

With additional works of art related to slavery, the bus boycott, and the justice system

*Learn about visiting

Bus Boycott, 1955

Court Square

Clydetta Fulmer’s statue of Rosa Parks boarding the bus

Rosa Parks Library and Museum*

252 Montgomery St.

Image courtesy Rosa Parks Museum

Artis Lane’s bust of Rosa Parks

Image courtesy Rosa Parks Museum

Erik Blome’s statue of Rosa on the bus

*Learn about visiting

Freedom Rides, 1961

Freedom Rides Museum

210 S. Court St.

Image courtesy the Alabama Historical Commission

Nora Ezell, Freedom Riders May, 1961

*Learn about visiting

Related to Selma to Montgomery March, 1965

St. Jude

2048 W. Fairview Ave.

Barrett Bailey and Jon Cook’s statue of Voting Rights Marchers

Timothy Schmalz’s Homeless Jesus/Jesus the Homeless

MMFA’s youth murals Remembering the March (located behind St. Jude)

Click here to learn about the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail.

Mount Zion AME Zion Church

657 Holt St.

Cottage Hill Roundabout at Goldthwaite Street

Barrett Bailey and Jon Cook’s statue of Voting Rights Marchers

Montgomery St. facing Lee St.

Sunny Paulk’s Selma to Montgomery March mural

Legacy of King/Civil Rights Movement in Alabama

South Perry St. and Washington Ave.

The dream catcher portrait of King

RSA Pavilion Park

361 Monroe St.

Lawrence Godwin’s relief about the Civil Rights Movement

King Memorial Dexter Avenue Baptist Church*

454 Dexter Ave.

Image courtesy Montgomery Advertiser

John Feagin’s mural

*Learn about visiting

Civil Rights Memorial Center

400 Washington Ave.

Image courtesy Tolerance.org, SPLC

Maya Lin Civil Rights Memorial

*Learn about visiting

National Center for the Study of Civil Rights and African American Culture at Alabama State University

1345 Carter Hill Rd.

Civil Rights murals designed by John Feagin

Rufus A King Library

3095 Mobile Highway

Bill Ford’s Civil Rights murals

Today

Court Square

Image courtesy Montgomery Advertiser

Juneteenth Art on the Square Project created by I Am More Than, King’s Canvas, and 21 Dreams, 2020

Related Events

Down Yonder, I Heard Somebody Calling my Name

On view at the Rosa Parks Museum beginning June 25, 2020
Learn More

 


 

Art of the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery

Saturday, July 18; 10 AM

Madeline Burkhardt of the Rosa Parks Museum, Dorothy Walker of the Freedom Rides Museum, Artist Bill Ford, and Curator of Education Alice Novak discuss artists’ representation of the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery. The conversation focuses on works held by our partners’ institutions including representations of Rosa Park’s participation in the Bus Boycott (1955), the Freedom Rides (1961), and Bill Ford’s murals at the Bertha P. Williams Library, which commemorate the Selma to Montgomery March (1965).

Souls Grown Deep Acquisition

During the summer of 2019, the Museum celebrated the addition of five works by contemporary African American artists from Alabama to its permanent collection. They will be acquired over the next two years under terms of an agreement with the Atlanta-based Souls Grown Deep Foundation (SGDF). The pieces are a part of SGDF’s William S. Arnett Collection and include a major work by Thornton Dial, Sr.; an early work by Jimmy Lee Sudduth; and three quilts made by Gee’s Bend quiltmakers Minnie Sue Coleman, Emma Mae Hall Pettway, and Joanna Pettway.

Director Angie Dodson explained the significance of this acquisition: “Acquiring these works allows the Museum to better reflect the breadth of identities and lived experiences of the residents and visitors to the city and region.” She added, “We praise the Foundation for putting the proceeds from the sale of these works towards the creation of a paid internship program for students of color to gain experience in the museum field. We very much hope to host and nurture SGDF interns in the many years to come, to do our part in changing the face of our profession, to better reflect the communities with whom we work.”

The acquisition of these five objects is the realization of many years of thought and planning, beginning in 2015 when the Museum partnered with the SGDF on the exhibition History Refused to Die: The Enduring Legacy of the African American Art of Alabama—an exhibition and publication project the two institutions realized in conjunction with the Alabama Contemporary Arts Center in Mobile. During this collaboration, the Museum and SGDF discussed the importance of a commitment to eventually return some of this work to its origins, the place of its creation.

Thornton Dial, Sr. (American, 1928–2016), Lost Americans, 2008, mixed media on wood, Lent by Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection, IL2019.1.2; © 2019 Estate of Thornton Dial / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Photograph by Stephen Pitkin / Pitkin Studio / Art Resource, NY

The Museum joins some 16 other prestigious art-collecting institutions in the United States in adding examples of art by these Alabamians to their collections representing American art of the 20th century. Not only relevant to us here in the state or region, these works have come to represent the many important themes that resonate in American history over the last century—those that relate to social changes represented by the Civil Rights Movement; the social shifts from the rural to the industrial and urban environment; and the economic shifts that increasingly came to divide America by race, class, and educational status. These works address these themes with innovation and ingenuity and deliver powerful messages about the America that we know today.

The works being acquired include a major mixed-media assemblage by Emelle native Thornton Dial, Sr. (1928–2016). In his work Lost Americans (2008) (pictured above), the artist recognized that American society in the 20th century was characterized by a tendency for violence as a result of deep cultural discord, leaving some of her citizens lost, disconnected, and left behind, failing to achieve the happiness and prosperity others took for granted. This damage to America’s traditional social contract has ramifications into the 21st century and beyond.

Artist Jimmy Lee Sudduth (1910–2007) lived and worked in Fayette in West Alabama. He was known for the use of a highly unusual medium he called “sweet mud.” Ferris Wheel at the Fairground (1988) (pictured below) reflects the artist’s earliest combinations of paint and clay in which the dried clay medium is applied with a light touch (almost as pastel) and produced a magical, almost surreal quality. This work expands the representation of subjects that the Museum has by Sudduth, in which he used a technique that was distinctive in its masterful application of the clay.

Jimmy Lee Sudduth (American, 1910–2007), Ferris Wheel at the Fairground, 1988, house paint and earth pigments on plywood, Lent by Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection, IL2019.1.5; © Estate of Jimmy Lee Sudduth; Photograph by Stephen Pitkin / Pitkin Studio / Art Resource, NY

Finally, the Museum is adding three significant examples of work by members of the famed group of quiltmakers of Gee’s Bend in Wilcox County. A quilt-making cooperative known as the “Freedom Quilting Bee” was formed on March 26, 1966, by some 60 quiltmakers in Gee’s Bend under the leadership of Minder Coleman, a quilter and community leader, and an Episcopal priest, Father Francis X. Walter. The Bee brought tangible economic benefits (such as washing machines and upgrades to electrical service or plumbing) to the families of the Bend through the sale of communally made quilts. Today these works are valued as extraordinary examples of design adapted from traditional sources but expressing a distinctly bold and vibrantly colorful vision.

One of the quilts is by Minder Coleman’s daughter, Minnie Sue Coleman (1926–2012). Pig in a Pen Medallion (ca. 1970) (pictured at the top of the page) was one of the quilts included in the series of U.S. Postal stamps issued in 2006 that honored the quiltmakers of Gee’s Bend.

The other two quilts are by members of the Pettway family, often considered the leading family in the history of Gee’s Bend quilt making. Joanna Pettway (1924–1993) created one of the earliest examples of a quilt that is characterized by the classic elements of Gee’s Bend design—large rectangles of primarily solid color fabric in the housetop pattern—made around 1950. Emma Mae Hall Pettway (born 1932) made a rare double-sided quilt from corduroy scraps that were saved from the Bee after the sewing of pillow shams under contract for Sears, Roebuck, and Company in the mid-1970s.

The Museum is delighted to bring these works of art home to Alabama. Both for the sake of preserving Alabama’s rich cultural heritage, as well as for the sake of easing the artists’ and their descendants’ access to this art in the future, we welcome these objects into our collection and our galleries.

Related News Coverage

Montgomery Advertiser: Museum adds five treasures of Alabama’s African-American history


 

At Top: Photograph of the installation of three quilts (left to right): Mary Lee Bendolph (American, born 1935), Strings, 2003–2004, cotton corduroy, cotton, and cotton/ polyester blend, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Association Purchase in memory of Shirley A. Woods, MMFA Assistant Director, 1979–2008, 2008.9.1, © Mary Lee Bendolph / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Emma Mae Hall Pettway (American, born 1932), Bars/Strips, ca. 1975, cotton corduroy, Lent by Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection, © Emma Mae Hall, Photograph by Stephen Pitkin / Pitkin Studio / Art Resource, NY; Minnie Sue Coleman (American, 1926–2012), Pig in a Pen Medallion, ca. 1970, polyester, Lent by Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S Arnett Collection, © 2019 Estate of Minnie Sue Coleman / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, Photograph by Stephen Pitkin / Pitkin Studio / Art Resource, NY

Sunday Puzzle – In the Realm of the Fantastic

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Ford Crull’s dazzling In the Realm of the Fantastic.

Last Week’s Puzzle

Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s texture-rich Untitled (Two-Story Log Cabin)

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (35 Pieces)

Medium (99 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Ford Crull (American, born 1952), In the Realm of the Fantastic, 1999, oil, wax, and oil stick on canvas, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Association Purchase, 2000.7

Film Recommendations – June 2020

Scrolling through Netflix, Prime, and Hulu can be an endless rabbit hole. This month, we’ve chosen to spotlight films that both challenge our own entrenched ways of thinking, as a people and society, and celebrate Black artists, heritage, and culture in honor of Juneteenth.

As Is by Nick Cave

Not Rated | 1h 10min

This 2015 behind the scenes documentary follows fabric sculptor, dancer, and performance artist Nick Cave as he travels to Shreveport, Louisiana to begin an eight-month art project leading up to a one-time multimedia performance featuring hundreds of local artists, musicians, soundsuit dancers, and members of the community.

Where to Watch

Stream: Amazon | Rent: Amazon

MMFA Collection Connections

Yvonne Wells, Nora EzellCharlie Lucas, Lisa Hoke, Elayne Goodman, and Mary Proctor

Black Panther

PG-13 | 2h 14min | 97% Rotten Tomatoes

In this 2018 Marvel Cinematic Universe installment, T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman), heir to the hidden but advanced kingdom of Wakanda, who must take his place as King. However, when an old enemy reappears, T’Challa’s character as King and Black Panther is tested when he is drawn into a conflict that puts the entire fate of Wakanda and the world at risk. This is quite possibly the best Marvel film for so many reasons. From an art perspective, the soundtrack and imagery in Black Panther relies heavily on cultural traditions African countries and ethnic groups from across the continent.

Where to Watch

Stream: Disney+, Hulu | Rent: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube

MMFA Collection Connections

African Collection, Dan Peoples, Yoruba Peoples, and Bassa Peoples

Additional Reading

Becoming Black Panther: 12 African Art Inspirations for Blockbuster Movie

The Hate U Give

Rated PG-13 | 2hr 13min | 97% Rotten Tomatoes

Starr Carter (Amandla Stenberg) is constantly switching between two worlds—the poor, mostly black neighborhood where she lives and the wealthy, mostly white prep school that she attends. The uneasy balance is shattered when she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend at the hands of a police officer. Facing pressure from all sides of the community, Starr must find her voice and decide to stand up for what’s right.

Where to Watch

Stream: Hulu | Rent: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube

MMFA Collection Connections

Anne Goldthwaite, Roland L. Freeman, and John Lapsley

Just Mercy

Rated PG-13 | 2hr 17min | 83% Rotten Tomatoes

Based on his memoir, this film follows recent Harvard graduate Bryan Stevenson (Michael B. Jordan) as he heads to Alabama. The film tells the story of one of his first cases, Walter McMillian (Jaime Fox), a man sentenced to die in 1987 for the murder of an 18-year-old girl, despite evidence proving his innocence. After years of racism, legal and political maneuvering, Stevenson fights for McMillian’s life to appeal his conviction.

Where to Watch

Rent: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube

MMFA Collection Connections

Yvonne Wells and Anne Goldthwaite

Additional Reading

 Discussion Topics from EJI

Kehinde Wiley: An Economy of Grace

Rated PG | 53min

Known for his vibrant, larger-than-life reinterpretations of classical portraits featuring young African American men, Wiley steps out of his comfort zone to create a new project: a series of classical portraits of African-American women. The film, Kehinde Wiley: An Economy of Grace, documents the project as it unfolds, tracking Wiley’s process from concept to canvas, coming to know the women whom he selects to paint, and enlisting Riccardo Tisci of Givenchy to create couture gowns for each woman.

Where to Watch

Stream: Amazon | Rent: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, YouTube

MMFA Collection Connections

Elizabeth Catlett, Chester Higgins, and Hale Woodruff

Selma

Rated PG-13 | 2hr 7min | 99% Rotten Tomatoes

Although the Civil Rights Act of 1964 legally desegregated the South, discrimination remained rampant in certain areas, making it very difficult for black Americans to register to vote. In 1965, the Alabama city of Selma became the battleground in the fight for suffrage. Despite violent opposition, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (David Oyelowo) and his followers pressed forward on an epic march from Selma to Montgomery, and their efforts culminated in President Lyndon Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Where to Watch

Stream: FX Now | Rent: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube

MMFA Collection Connections

Yousuf Karsh, Charles Shannon, and Walker Evans

Sunday Puzzle – Untitled (Two-Story Log Cabin)

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s texture-rich Untitled (Two-Story Log Cabin)

Last Week’s Puzzle

John Kelly Fitzpatrick’s dreamy Parisian book shop.

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (36 Pieces)

Medium (100 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Jimmy Lee Sudduth (American, 1910–2007), Untitled (Two-Story Log Cabin), ca. 1975, house paint and earth pigments on plywood, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of Georgine and Jack Clarke, 2004.17.2

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