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Month: May 2020

Sunday Puzzle – The Book Shop, Paris

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is John Kelly Fitzpatrick’s dreamy Parisian book shop.

Last Week’s Puzzle

Leonard Koscianski’s colorful Red Fish

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (35 Pieces)

Medium (100 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Kelly Fitzpatrick (American, 1888–1953), The Book Shop, Paris, 1930, gouache on fiberboard, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of Mrs. Benjamin Fitzpatrick, 1970.45

Local Artists Live – Milton Madison

Have you ever wondered what goes on behind-the-scenes in studios of local artists? On Saturday, June 27, Montgomery artist Milton Madison will broadcast live on the Museum’s Instagram—opening his studio space to share his artwork, reflect on his inspirations, and offer a live Q&A with his audience! This is a great chance to meet one of our local artists and learn about his creations.

Video

Above is a recording of the June 27 live stream event that was originally broadcast on the Museum’s Instagram account. Click here to follow the Museum on Instagram

Get to Know the Artist

For this weekend’s Local Artists Live featured artist Milton Madison, the Black culture he was brought up with and lives daily is not just part of his identity, but was a strong influence in his art. Milton grew up in Birmingham but has been a Montgomery-area local since 1995; he recalls visiting the capital city every Thanksgiving as a child to attend the Turkey Day Classic, a tradition for his and many other Black Southern families. Keeping to his roots and following in the footsteps of his family members, Milton went on to attend Alabama State University, where he earned his Bachelor’s Degree in Graphic Arts.

Milton recalls having creative interests as a child but that he was limited in how he was able to express himself–mostly only through drawing, so he drew a lot. He remembers his first exposure or introduction to this foundational artform when his uncle showed him how to draw a Porsche 911 as a “penny racer” by using two pennies for the wheels. This vivid memory of an experience that Milton states, “Blew [his] mind!”, is what first set him on the path to making art. He also attributes his frequent reading of comic books in his youth for teaching him all that he knows, and even thought early-on that he would pursue a career as a cartoonist. His passion for comic books affected his career, resulting in his becoming a graphic designer; such connections can be identified by looking closely at his art.

Continue reading to find out more about Milton’s passions, influences, and how his culture is inherently intertwined with his art, and be sure to tune in on Saturday, June 27 at 10 AM, when Milton takes over the MMFA’s Instagram account for a behind-the-scenes look at his studio space and creations.

What is your favorite thing about living in the South?

I definitely would have to say the culture. Oh, and the summers and mild winters although they didn’t used to be as mild as they are now. Some people don’t remember we really used to have real winter!!! Thanks, climate change. But most of all [my favorite thing is] the culture. The rich culture of our people and what they’ve persevered through: being the torchbearers for the Civil Rights struggles and the many changes they made that shook the world and helped shape change in this nation. I’m honored to stand on their shoulders and be someone who keeps the wheels of change going in the right direction for our people.

What excites you most about the growth of Montgomery’s art scene?

First of all–that we finally have one!!! That wasn’t always the case, or at least not for Black people. I’ve been here since 1995 so I’ve seen the needed change and waited desperately for it. It seemed like there was art here in the city, but it was always kinda like pretty flowers and cotton fields-type art.

What is your favorite work of art from the MMFA’s collection, and what specifically about the artwork speaks strongly to you?

I don’t have one specific artwork, but I really like the glass gallery with the skylight. I make sure to visit it every time I’m in the Museum, looking at how the light in that space spreads through the organic shapes of the glass and thinking about how glass can take on these forms.

Milton Madison, 2 dope Bois, acrylic on canvas, 30″x40″

What piece of art that you have created is your favorite, and why?

My OutKast piece, 2 dope Bois (pictured at right) because of the memories that come to me when I think about the first time I heard [the Hip Hop duo] OutKast, me and my cousin in my granddad’s sky blue Cavalier being introduced to a new Hip Hop. I shared a lot of my special moments in Hip Hop with my cousin, and so when I see or hear OutKast I think about us. Their music helped shape the minds and cultures of young black men, especially in the South. It was all about our experiences and the things we were seeing. True pioneers in Hip Hop. So to admire them as much as I do and to be able to capture a pretty decent likeness of them, and to have executed a Hip Hop type feel with the graffiti and different styles of art that are represented in that piece…I’m really proud of it.

Do you have an all-time favorite work of art, and have you seen it in person?

No, but I would love to see the Sistine Chapel.

Tell us about your most preferred place to be on earth. What role, if any, does that place play in shaping you as an artist?

That’s a really good question. I don’t have a definite answer to that but I really enjoy Chicago. It has a very rich and diverse art scene that I admire. I’ll have to get back there one day so that I can take it all in. I really enjoy the beach as well; the sounds of the ocean are very relaxing and therapeutic. One of these days I’d like to visit New York for two or three weeks so I can just take in their art scene.

What drives your creativity?

My energy; energy drives my creativity. A lot of times I have to sit back and process what I’m feeling before I can create. My energy has to be right for me to create.

What is your preferred medium?

I guess I would have to say acrylics because that’s what I use most, but I also enjoy watercolors and drawing of course.

Do you listen to any particular music when you create?

Jazz and Hip Hop

What advice would you give to beginning artists?

Just try to surround yourself with as much art as you possibly can. Go to galleries, take in things that visually stimulate you, get online if you don’t have any galleries nearby. Go to Instagram and follow some artists, explore the world through your phone if you have to. Personal experiences are great to draw from. Just keep creating, and the opportunities to be seen and exposed as an artist are sure to come.

Local Artists Live – Chintia Kirana

Have you ever wondered what goes on behind-the-scenes in studios of local artists? On Saturday, June 13, Montgomery artist Chintia Kirana will broadcast live on the Museum’s Instagram—opening her studio space to share her artwork, reflect on her inspirations, and offer a live Q&A with her audience! This is a great chance to meet one of our local artists and learn about her creations.

Video

Above is a recording of the June 13 live stream event that was originally broadcast on the Museum’s Instagram account. Click here to follow the Museum on Instagram

Get to Know the Artist

This weekend’s featured artist on Local Artists Live, Chintia Kirana, became an artist by way of natural curiosity and a strong desire to create, even from a very young age. Less poetically and more terrifyingly, she became a Montgomerian by way of escaping persecution in her native country of Indonesia. The experience of fleeing Indonesia as a child to seek refuge in America developed in Chintia a wisdom that, in real life as in art, there are similarities that connect us all, even through perceived differences.

Chintia recalls living through a terrifying political uprising in her early youth in Indonesia, and fleeing to America to ultimately arrive in Montgomery on Christmas Eve of 1999. Growing up, she experienced a comfortable life until the fall of President Suharto and the political uprising that followed. Chinese descendants in Indonesia were targeted by radical groups, resulting in looting, killing, and burning of property. Chintia remembers not being able to go to school because the streets were patrolled by those radical groups; on one occasion, a bus she was on had to change route because they had received news that another bus was taken over and the kids riding on it had been kidnapped. In addition to the uprising, tragedy struck her family; Chintia’s dad got malaria, her grandmother on her mom’s side passed away, and the economy tanked, resulting in her family losing everything. She remembers coming home day after day and seeing her mom selling their furniture; one by one everything was gone. They lost everything. Fortunately, they were to be able to flee and start over in the States.

Chintia relied on her artistic abilities as a means to communicate in this new place after arriving in Montgomery, and she recalls spending her teenage years learning to speak English by watching the Disney Channel and MTV. She considers herself fortunate to have received formal training in the visual arts while attending Booker T. Washington Magnet High School. After graduating from BTW in 2005, Chintia continued her creative pursuits at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, where she earned her MFA in Painting and Drawing. In 2016, she relocated her studio back to Montgomery, where she happily continues to reside today.

One of Chintia’s former professors and a continued mentor for her, Najjar Abdul-Musawwir has told her, “In simplicity you’ll find profoundness.” She has continued to live and work to achieve this sage-like mindset, and it is certainly reflected through her art. Read on below to find out more about Chintia Kirana, her art and processes, and her ideas on how an engaged community has the power to bring about great transformation.

What is your favorite thing about living in the south?

I get to see my parents more often and I do not have to shovel snow!

What excites you most about the growth of Montgomery’s art scene?

Um…this one question could get political quite fast. The pursuit of exploration, exchange, and experimentation in Montgomery’s artistic community is quite slow compared to those in bigger cities. This could very well be due to the limited funding and philanthropic entities to support and encourage local artists. With that said, I am thrilled to see artists taking matters into their own hands by starting groups and creating their own opportunities. I am also excited to see the efforts of arts institutions, such as the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, to engage members and patrons. Artists are typically motivated and would never stop making their work–what we need is more support from patrons to fund artistic explorations, perhaps art in public spaces. More programming and access to arts in our city would help push forth the growth of the artistic community.

What piece of art that you have created is your favorite, and why?

A piece called In Time (pictured above) is one of my favorites. It is made of eggshells and typically hung with microfilaments. The shape and size are created according to its space. I enjoy this piece due to its simplicity and its symbiotic complexity. It is very labor-intensive from start to finish. In the end, the piece became a monument of time passed. Some other favorites would be the Inside Out Project with JR, Expose Art, and MAP, perhaps because this is still fresh in my mind. I’d like to add The Inside Out project would not have been possible without the community stakeholders such as the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Poarch Band of Creek Indians, Montgomery Biscuits, Alabama Power and many more! It was a beautiful journey, to be able to connect and showcase an accurate portrait of Montgomery today, a community of individuals who are loving, intelligent, passionate, creative, and evolving together. This project reminds us that the power to transform exists within each of us; that an engaged loving community is the way forward.

What is your favorite work of art from the MMFA’s collection, and what specifically about the artwork speaks strongly to you?

Edward Hopper’s New York Office. I enjoy his composition and use of shadows to create and extend the mystery within this painting. I love the simplicity and stillness—It is quiet but not silent.

Do you have an all-time favorite work of art, and have you seen it in person?

If you have, how did you feel in the moment? One of my favorite pieces is from the artist Michelangelo Pistoletto. I saw his piece One and One Makes Three in San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice, Italy. The piece consists of a dozen suspended mirrors. On the back of the pieces, the phrase Love Difference is written in different languages. The viewers are able to be in the center of the piece. When I entered the piece, my infinite reflection became a part of the art, thus bringing art and life together. It was also an allegory of how similar we are on the inside despite our ethnicity, cultural and religious differences.

Tell us about your most preferred place to be on earth. What role, if any, has the energy of that place helped shape you as an artist?

I am a bit of a nomad with a gypsy spirit. It’s very hard to pinpoint a preferred location because each place and space brings different experiences. I love being in New York and Paris (mais mon Francais est terrible!). In the future, I’d love to visit (perhaps even reside in) a monastery in Nepal or Tibet.

What drives your creativity?

Freedom—the freedom to create without boundaries or restrictions.

What is your preferred medium?

I tend to be very minimal with mediums and typically they are things accumulated over the years such as eggshells, ashes, and carbon build-up. I love the idea of rebirth, of deconstruction and reconstruction of materials. Objects and materials are embedded with meaning, therefore the materials used typically depend on the content of the work I’m creating. I’m not a purist by any means; I enjoy exploring and experimenting with different media. Oftentimes, the challenge is finding resources to do the work. For example, before the pandemic, I had started exploring glass blowing at a friend’s studio in Macon, GA. I truly enjoy the property of glass, how it can be both liquid and solid. Sadly, I only made three glass blown eggs before the lockdown. Another “to do” on the list!

Do you listen to any particular music when you create?

I do! The music depends on the mood in the studio. My playlist includes Bach, Philip Glass, Iannis Xenakis, Ben E. King, Bill Withers, Art School Girlfriend, Mumford & Sons, The Weeknd, and many more!

What advice would you give to beginning artists?

Life as an artist is not easy; nothing worth doing is easy. Remember to stay true to who you are and your work.

Above: Chintia Kirana, In Time, 2013, eggshells

Sunday Puzzle – Red Fish

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Leonard Koscianski’s colorful Red Fish.

Last Week’s Puzzle

Cappy Thompson’s magnificent Stars Falling on Alabama: We are Enraptured by the Celestial Fireworks of the Muses

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (35 Pieces)

Medium (99 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Leonard Koscianski (American, born 1952), Red Fish, 1990, Oil on canvas, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Association Purchase, 1991.17

Meet the Publisher – Paulson Fontaine Press

Photograph of Rhea Fontaine (left) and Pam Paulson (right) by Taliesin Gilkes-Bower, Courtesy of Paulson Fontaine Press

Though we are unable to share this exhibition with you in person at this time, the Museum is pleased to be able to provide a first look at Personal to Political: Celebrating the African American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press. Organized by Carrie Lederer, Curator of Exhibitions, Bedford Gallery, Lesher Center for the Arts, Walnut Creek, California, the exhibition features works by African American artists who have helped to shape the contemporary art conversation. Presenting a wide range of prints, paintings, quilts, and sculptures, the works on view include an array of abstract and formal imagery depicting narratives that speak to personal experiences and political perspectives.

All the prints were created at Paulson Fontaine Press (PFP), which is run by two extraordinary women. Pam Paulson received a BFA in Painting from the University of Texas Arlington in 1979, and an MFA in Painting from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1982. Paulson then worked as a Master Printer at Crown Point Press in San Francisco for several years. There she found her calling; working with artists to create prints. She began Paulson Press in 1993 and began publishing prints with former partner Renee Bott in 1996.

Rhea Fontaine received a BA in Fine Art from the University of California, Berkeley in 1998, and a Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Museum Studies from Studio Art Centers International in Florence, Italy in 2000. Fontaine joined the press in 2002 and along with Paulson helped mold a publishing program from their shared interest in promoting diversity. The press has published numerous projects with artists of color and women artists. In 2016, Fontaine became a partner and the press was renamed Paulson Fontaine Press.

MMFA Curator Jennifer Jankauskas caught up with both partners to learn more about the Press, their dedication to working with African American artists, and some of the works featured in the exhibition.

Lonnie Holley, “Our Journey,” 2013, color softground aquatint etching with roulette, Courtesy of Paulson Fontaine Press, Berkeley, CA

I know that PFP works with many contemporary artists at various stages in their careers, but the press has a special commitment to working with African American artists. Why is that important to PFP?

We have a strong shared interest in the history of American civil rights, which has influenced our publishing decisions. As a woman and minority-owned business, we are very mindful of equality and representation in the art world. We are proud to use our platform to promote diversity. It is exciting to see that the art world has recently begun to focus on this trove of underrepresented talent, and we are pleased to see a shift in the canon.

What is the process for starting a project? Do you reach out to the artist or vice versa? Can you elaborate on how this works?

We follow the careers of many artists with great interest. When we feel that an artist is a good fit for our program, we reach out and invite them. We work with four to five artists per year. Ideally, we visit an artists’ studio before their residency at the press. This allows us to observe how they make work and it helps us navigate translation into the print medium. Artists are busy people, so we often schedule projects years in advance.

Martin Puryear, Untitled (State II), 2014, color softground etching with drypoint and chine collé, Courtesy of Paulson Fontaine Press, Berkeley, CA

Do most of the artists you work with have prior printmaking experience, or is it new to them?

Most artists are not fluid in printmaking. If they have had prior experience, they have usually forgotten the specifics, or it was in a different style of printmaking than what we typically do, intaglio. When an artist is in the studio, our goal is to aid them in the creation of unique editions. The artist has control over all artistic decisions, and we support them by providing tools and technical know-how. It can be difficult for an artist to adjust to working backward and in layers. Our job as printers is to help them push past the learning curve of printmaking and enable them to make the marks they want to make.

I know that printmaking is a very collaborative endeavor between the artists and the master printmakers. PFP seems to take an approach that allows for a lot of involvement and experimentation on the part of the artist to achieve what they want. I imagine this is incredibly fulfilling for the artists. Can you describe how the process works?

We try to avoid saying no. When an artist poses a question in the studio, we do our best to allow that line of thinking to unfold. Sometimes this means that the prints will be more labor-intensive and difficult to produce. We do our best to embrace the challenge. For example, when we worked with Samuel Levi Jones, we could feel that the compositions need to be larger. So, we set up a sewing machine and stitched multiple prints together to create bigger prints. Sam instructed us with the sewing, and we zig-zag stitched our way into prints as large as 65″ x 65″.

Kerry James Marshall, “Vignette (Wishing Well),” 2010, color aquatint etching with collage, Courtesy of Paulson Fontaine Press, Berkeley, CA

Can you discuss a few other memorable experiences with some of the artists featured in the exhibition Personal to Political?

Kerry James Marshall does things his own way. While making the plates for the print Vignette (Wishing Well) (at right), Kerry revealed the intricacies of his studio practice. Our interest was piqued when he walked into the studio with a handful of black Barbie dolls. It turns out that Kerry fashions the clothes that are worn by his figures. He wants the style to be timeless and ambiguous; he made the top from a tube sock, and the skirts’ oversized buttons are from a coat and loom large in proportion to the doll who wore it. This methodical approach and attention to detail anchor his paintings and prints with totally believable worlds.

Critics recognize Martin Puryear as a figure of undeniable importance in American sculpture, and we’ve been making prints with him since 2001. It was during our very first project together that the Twin Towers fell on September 11th, 2001. It is said that adversity doesn’t build character, it reveals it. Martin’s focused and thoughtful presence helped guide us through that difficult time. We all continued to work, concentrating on our purpose, watching Martin build steady lines, one upon the next; each work revealing new possibilities.

Born in Alabama, Lonnie Holley is a self-taught artist who creates his work from the things he collects everywhere he goes. There is not a random piece of wire or a colorful plastic bag he wouldn’t like to meet. As the seventh of 27 children, Lonnie grew up fast, making his own way in the world by pulling a wagon and collecting other men’s trash to re-sell or repurpose. Lonnie’s practice and purpose is to show people that their wasteful ways are hurting the planet and the humans who live on it. Noticing a piece of old plywood in the studio last time he was at PFP, Lonnie grabbed our jigsaw and started cutting out figures, which became the matrices we used for woodblock prints. These woodblocks expose his predilection for nested and overlapping human presences, ancestries and communities, and the promises of a future within the past.

Louisiana Pettway Bendolph, “American Housetop (For the Arnett’s),” 2005, color softground etching with aquatint and spitbite aquatint, Courtesy of Paulson Fontaine Press, Berkeley, CA

What themes emerge in the exhibition that really speak to you and why?

Overall, what speaks to us is the richness of each individual artist’s path. The uniqueness of each exploration and its power to speak truth.

What has Paulson Fontaine Press been doing during the pandemic?

The gallery has been closed to the public and we have been working a reduced schedule, rotating shifts one person at a time. We were able to start a new print with Mary Lee Bendolph, one of the Gee’s Bend quilters, which we are proofing through the mail. We hope to release it this summer.

Any other thoughts you would like to add?

We are thrilled that the exhibition traveled to Montgomery! Montgomery is so historically significant to the American civil rights movement, and the work in the show draws so much from that shared history. We had planned to see the show at the Montgomery Museum of Art and to attend Mayday in Gee’s Bend this year. We hope we and the public will be able to see it at some point.

Related Programs

Creative Conversations: Personal to Political, Part I

Wednesday, June 17 at 5:30 PM
With Milton Madison and Lynthia Edwards

Watch on Facebook Live

Creative Conversations: Personal to Political, Part II

Wednesday, July 8 at 5:30 PM
With Radcliffe Bailey and Lava Thomas

Watch on Facebook Live

Film Recommendations – May 2020

Scrolling through Netflix, Prime, and Hulu can be an endless rabbit hole. To help your search, we’re spotlighting three films related to art that you should watch during the stay at home order.

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

PG-13 | 1h 43min | 80% Rotten Tomatoes

This John Hughes 1980s coming of age film follows high school senior Ferris Bueller (Matthew Broderick), who decided to skip school to hang out with his girlfriend and best friend. The friends visit several Chicago landmarks, including a trip to the Art Institute of Chicago.

Where to Watch

Stream: Netflix | Rent: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube

MMFA Collection Connections

Mary Cassatt, Edward Hopper, and Pablo Picasso

Midnight in Paris

PG-13 | 1h 40min | 93% Rotten Tomatoes

Woody Allen’s time travel comedy follows Gil Pender (Owen Wilson), a successful but unfulfilled Hollywood screenwriter who travels to Paris with his fiancé and her conservative family. One night Gil gets drunk and lost in the streets of Paris, where he is picked up by a vintage car that allows him to travel back in time to meet artists including Salvador Dalí, Man Ray, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Paul Gauguin, and Edgar Degas.

Where to Watch

Stream: Amazon (with ads) | Rent: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube

MMFA Collection Connections

Ferdinand-Jean Luigini, Frank Myers Boggs, and Luigi Loir

The Thomas Crown Affair

Rated R | 2h | 70% Rotten Tomatoes

In this art heist remake, Thomas Crown (Pierce Brosnan), a multi-millionaire who steals Claude Monet’s San Giorgio Maggiore at Dusk from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This causes an attractive insurance investigator (Rene Russo) to pursue him for the crime and before long the two fall in love.

Where to Watch

Stream: HBO | Rent: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube

MMFA Collection Connections

Theodore Earl Butler and Jules Ernest Renoux

Sunday Puzzle – Stars Falling on Alabama

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle features the center portion of Cappy Thompson’s magnificent Stars Falling on Alabama: We are Enraptured by the Celestial Fireworks of the Muses, 2005.

Last Week’s Puzzle

Severin Roesen’s opulent Still Life with Mixed Flowers and Bird’s Nest, ca. 1851–1859

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (36 Pieces)

Medium (98 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Cappy Thompson (American, born 1952), Stars Falling on Alabama: We are Enraptured by the Celestial Fireworks of the Muses, 2005, vitreous enamel on glass, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Association Commission, 2006.2

Book Recommendations – May 2020

Several members of the Museum’s book club, Ekphrasis, reflected on their collective favorites over the years in order to make some recommendations for you. Below are some of their selections—check back each month for additional suggestions—happy reading!

Click here to browse April’s recommendations.

Related Programs

Ekphrasis: The Last Castle
Wednesday, June 10; 5:30 PM

Ekphrasis: In Sunlight or in Shadow
Wednesday, July 8; 5:30 PM

About Ekphrasis

The Museum’s book club is expanding! ​All individuals are invited to join Ekphrasis regardless of Museum membership. If you would like to join Ekphrasis, please complete ​the form​ below​.

Membership Form

If you have​ any questions, please contact Brandy Morrison at bmorrison@mmfa.org.

The Lady In Gold

Book

The Lady In Gold: The Extraordinary Tale of Gustav Klimt’s Masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer

Editor

Anne-Marie O’Connor

Why You Should Read

“Lady in Gold is an important book about a Gustav Klimt portrait of a fascinating woman in Vienna that was looted by the Nazis, the American Supreme Court’s verdict in favor of her descendant, and the young lawyer who gave up everything to seek justice.” – Alice Novak, book club leader

“The true story behind the film, unraveling the portrait’s journey with differing roles that art plays in politics, society, identity, and memory.” – Carol Tew

Where to Purchase

Physical: Amazon, Bookshop | Digital: Apple Books, Kindle | Audiobook: Apple Books, Audible

Related Content

Gustav Klimt, Adele Bloch-Bauer I, 1907

Loving Frank

Book

Loving Frank: A Novel

Author

Nancy Horan

Why You Should Read

“I enjoyed the book and the presentation by Alice and Jim Barganier. Learned much about Frank Lloyd Wright that I never knew.” – Beverly Bennett

“What’s not to love about the book Loving Frank? It’s an intelligent blend of truth and fiction… a story about passionate characters with a jaw-dropping conclusion.” – Amy Lovett

Where to Purchase

Physical: Amazon, Bookshop | Digital: Apple Books, Kindle | Audiobook: Apple Books, Audible

Related Content

Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Mad Enchantment

Book

Mad Enchantment Claude Monet and the Painting of the Water Lilies

Author

Ross King

Why You Should Read

“A wonderful portrait of Monet and his times, with special emphasis on his last great work.” – George Jacobsen

“While Monet is one of the most loved artists in the world, few of us know the whole story about the Water Lillies that he painted in his garden at Giverny, including the gift of his paintings to France as a memorial to the First World War.” – Alice Novak, book club leader

“I enjoy everything by Ross King. His text reads like fiction with so many interesting facts and tidbits.” – Pamela Swan (who loves King’s Brunelleschi’s Dome most of all)

Where to Purchase

Physical: Amazon, Bookshop | Digital: Apple Books, Kindle | Audiobook: Apple Books, Audible

Related Content

Musée de l’Orangerie

Sunday Puzzle – Still Life

Each week we will share a new puzzle featuring an artwork from the Museum’s collection. Whether a solo personal challenge or joint family effort, we make it easy for you to get started solving—simply play on your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

This week’s puzzle is Severin Roesen’s opulent Still Life with Mixed Flowers and Bird’s Nest, ca. 1851–1859.

How to Play

Click with a mouse or drag with your finger the digital puzzle pieces into place. Correct alignments will snap together.

Icons

On the Bottom Left

  • Image icon – click to see the work you are putting together
  • Ghost icon – click to see an opaque image of the work on the puzzle board
  • Dotted Square icon – click to arrange or disarrange the puzzle pieces
  • Three Dots icon – click to select to restart the puzzle, change your background color, adjust settings, or get help

On the Bottom Right

  • Puzzle icon – click to play on Jigsaw Planet
  • Window icon – click to play in full-screen mode

Easy (36 Pieces)

Medium (100 Pieces)

Hard (252 Pieces)

Extreme (300 Pieces + Rotation)

How to Rotate Pieces

  • Mouse + Keyboard: 
    • Move the mouse wheel up (left rotation) or down (right rotation).
    • Or, press the left (left rotation) or right (right rotation) arrow key.
  • Touch: Tap on the piece and then tap on the appeared left or right rotation icon.

Credit

Severin Roesen (American, born Prussia, ca.1815–ca.1872), Still Life with Mixed Flowers and Bird’s Nest, ca. 1851–1859, oil on canvas, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of the Ida Belle Young Art Acquisition Fund, 2012.17

Animal Crossing at the MMFA

The Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts’s collection has been on view in its galleries and on its website. Now, some of our works can be in a gallery of your very own if you have a Nintendo Switch and the video game Animal Crossing: New Horizons.

Curate Your Own Digital Exhibition

From left to right: Severin Roesen, Still Life with Mixed Flowers and Bird’s Nest (detail), ca. 1851–1859; Frederick Warren Freer, Lady in Blue (detail), date unknown; Rembrandt van Rijn, Bearded Man in a Velvet Cap with Jewel Clasp, 1637; John Singer Sargent, Mrs Louis E. Raphael (Henriette Goldschmidt) (detail), ca. 1906

Animal Crossing is the latest entry of the popular life-simulation game, and famous paintings are a staple of the game’s museums; players can donate works of art to improve their island’s culture or add them to their homes or around the island, creating their own curated collection. Alongside the incredible efforts of our colleagues at The Met, The Getty, the Cincinnati Art Museum, and museums around the world, the MMFA’s curatorial department has made a selection of public domain images from our permanent collection easy to transport into your virtual homes and islands.

Steps

  • Browse our gallery of QR codes at the bottom of the page and select the work(s) you would like to import.
  • Scan the QR codes using the Nintendo Switch Online app. (Steps below via Polygon.)
    • You will need the Nintendo Switch Online app for Andriod or iOS.
    • Once you log in with your Nintendo account, you’ll be able to access Nook Link.
    • Press the Plus button on the New Horizons title screen to link your character with your Nintendo account, and use the app to scan the QR code.
    • After you scan it, open your designs on your Nook Phone and press the Plus button to download the design.
  • Enjoy the works of art you have added to your world!

Examples

Here are some of our own favorite artworks uploaded into some of the Museum staff’s Animal Crossing islands. Finally, our gratitude goes to the team behind the open-source Animal Crossing Pattern Tool for publishing their code and letting us use it!

From left to right: George Benjamin Luks, Tea Party (detail), 1922; Alexander Archipenko, Untitled (Construction) (detail), 1921

From left to right: Robert Henri, Young Chevass (Mary Ann Cafferty) (detail), 1925; Mary Cassatt, Francoise in Green, Sewing, 1908–1909; Frederick Warren Freer, Childhood (detail), date unknown

Share Your Animal Crossing World

We’d love to see how you decorate your houses–email us at pr@mmfa.org or share on social media and tag us @MontgomeryMFA on Twitter or Instagram.

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