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Category: General

It’s Time for Flimp 2017!

For the past twenty-eight years, the first weekend in May has been a time to celebrate the arts at the MMFA and in the Blount Cultural Park.  This year’s Flimp Festival will be held on Saturday, May 6, from 10:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. You won’t want to miss this event, which will feature all the traditional favorites, plus some happy surprises! 

The Flimp Festival at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts was inspired by the bronze fountain created by Alabama artist Geneva Mercer in the MMFA’s collection, which is on view in our Foyer for the day of the festival paying homage to the origin of the word Flimp, or Flower Imp. The Museum is partnering with BTW Magnet High School for the fourth year in a row and will showcase the talents of these local students from the Montgomery Public School System.

 

Traditionally, the festivities start off at 10:30 pm with the Do-Dah Parade of costumed pets, featuring dogs from the Montgomery Humane Society. Students from BTW act as guides for these worthy animals who are seeking their forever homes, dressing them up in costumes, walking with them in the parade, and then presenting them to the public to be adopted.  We encourage everyone to bring their pet in their most colorful attire to walk in the parade and compete for prizes awarded for costume creativity. Sign up in advance online, or the morning of the Festival from 10:00 to 10:20. To learn more, visit our Flimp Festival event page.

 

After this rousing start, the day is filled with activity around the grounds and in the building for families and visitors of all ages. Colorful chalk art fills the parking area, BTW students provide theatre, music, and dance performances on two stages, our permanent collection provides inspiration for our “Treasure Hunt,” and there are hands-on art activities in our studios, plus much more.   The theme for Flimp 2017 is Alabama Quilts and Quilting with our honored guest Yvonne Wells, whose quilts are featured in our MMFA collection.  Staff members and volunteers from the Alabama Department of Archives and History will be demonstrating the process of ginning cotton with a replica cotton gin while providing insight into the history of quilting in Alabama.

 

This year, our grounds are undergoing a transition as we build the Museum’s sculpture garden on the eastern side of the building.  For that reason, parking will be relocated, and we encourage you to consult this year’s Flimp Festival page for a map that will assist you in finding your way to parking as well as locating Flimp’s many events. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook @montgomerymfa to learn more about the schedule, upcoming events and any updates or changes!

We look forward to seeing you on Saturday, May 6 from 10:00 to 2:00 to experience all the fun of Flimp!

“Volunteer Voices” Part 1

At the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts there are many opportunities and activities for volunteers to be involved in. Volunteers can assist at the First Impressions Desk, where they greet visitors and provide information about current activities and exhibits, or work on special projects or museum-wide events. Docents are special volunteers who are trained to lead gallery tours, teach studio lessons and lead art projects for the general public. These are but a few of the roles docents play at the museum.

Volunteers and Docents spend hundreds of hours each year here at the museum. I thought it might interest you to know what several of them said in response to the following question:

“What drew you to the museum as a place to share your time and energy?”

  • “My docent friend, Grace, was a new docent and she kept telling me about the new adventures she was having, and I finally decided that I wanted to be part of the fun.” – Penny Thompson, Docent
  • “I was newly retired and relocated and wanted to find something to do while giving back to the community. I had always been interested in art and fell in love with the museum.” – George Jacobsen, Docent
  • “I love the atmosphere of the museum – free, artistic and it seems like people who visit want to immerse themselves into the artistic world.” – Meili Wang, First Impressions Volunteer, Special Events Volunteer and Muse (teen council member)
  • “When my husband and I first moved to Montgomery (over 20 years ago) we lived in a rental home. I would visit the museum several times a week to lift my spirits and soul. I found out from a retired professor at AUM that I might be able to teach workshops at the museum and my volunteering branched out into being a docent once I retired from teaching art.” – Maria Freedman, Docent

  • “After retiring I was looking for something to do. I thought about being an Uber driver, but somehow that didn’t feel right. My friend suggested that I give the museum a try (at the First Impressions Desk) and I have enjoyed seeing the public on a weekly basis. I get to come into a wonderful setting and imagine traveling to fabulous places with the American artists that have their artwork displayed in MMFA.” – Jack Banker, First Impressions Volunteer
  • “I have done volunteer work at several other places in the community. After coming to the museum I found it to be “My Happy Place.” I can feel like I am doing something good while I am there. I like being busy. I can assist the educational staff with projects: cutting out fish for the 5th-grade tours or helping visitors find more ways to enjoy their visit.” – Jeanne Polis, First Impressions Volunteer

 

Next time’s question answered through Volunteer Voices will be:

“Do you have a favorite or rewarding moment with visitors of the museum?”

Stay tuned!

-Meg Hall
Volunteer Coordinator

 

Image 1: Mattie DeJarnette, volunteer, at First Impressions Desk

Image 2: Frank Gitschier, docent, in Permanent Collection Galleries

Image 3: Lisa Newcomb, docent, in Permanent Collection Galleries

Image 4: Liz Land, docent, in ARTWORKS

Spring is in Full Swing at the MMFA

April is a season of renewal and growth.  Here at the MMFA, we  encourage you to visit the natural beauty of the Blount Cultural Park, stroll the Museum’s galleries, or participate in the many events we have scheduled throughout the month. Here is a sampling of the many activities designed for visitors of all ages.

First Sundays

Sunday, April 2, at 1 P.M.

Learn about works of art on view in the Museum’s permanent and temporary exhibitions. This FREE one-hour docent-led tour introduces some of the most important works in our collection. For more information call 334.240.4365. 

 

The Art of Baking Puppet Show

Thursday and Friday, April 6 and 7

This fun and educational event designed for three to six-year olds will be offered FREE at 9:30 and 10:45 A.M. on both days. Children will learn from charming animals working in a bakery on stage that “art is everywhere.”

 

Ekphrasis: Loving Frank: A Novel by Nancy Horan

Wednesday, April 12, 12 noon

Ekphrasis is a monthly book club devoted to the history of art. Works of fiction and non-fiction are featured, covering periods ranging from the ancient world to the present. See our website listing for more information, and  be sure to check out the delicious catered lunches by Jennie Weller Catering and Events which can be reserved with a call to the education department.

 

Stained Glass Workshop

Thursday, April 6, 13, 20, and 27, from 6 to 8 P.M.

For beginners as well as those with prior experience working with glass, this course  teaches all the steps in creating a stained glass window.

 

 

Short Course

Tuesdays at 12 noon, April 18, 25, and May 2

Enjoy this series of Tuesday noon gallery talks led by the Museum’s Curators giving more insight into our temporary exhibitions.

Film at the Museum: Girl With a Pearl Earring

Thursday, April 20, 5:30 P.M.

Have you ever imagined Vermeer’s studio, or how he created such strikingly quiet images in the midst of a busy household? Tracey Chevalier depicts Vermeer’s daily life in her novel, The Girl With a Pearl Earring, in which she imagines how Vermeer’s famous painting came to be.

 

 

 

Family Art Affair and Jazz Jams

Sunday, April 23, 2 P.M.

Let the music move you as you create artwork to take home! Each date has a specific theme related to Museum exhibitions, so bring the whole family for these FREE Sunday outings every month!

 

MAG Museum Exhibition Juror’s Critique

Saturday, April 29, 10:00 A.M.

Hear from juror Jim Neel about the varied expressions by local artists on view in the 42nd Montgomery Art Guild Museum Exhibition.

 

 

An Afternoon With Mary Lynne Levy

Sunday, April 30, 2 P.M.

Along with her many other civic contributions, Montgomery Art Guild  Featured Artist Mary Lynne Levy has long been active in Montgomery as an artist and supporter of the arts.

Teaching with Objects: Connecting Core Subjects to Works of Art!

Not too long ago at MMFA, an American history teacher had each of his students write about an era of our nation’s past as represented in a work of art in the Museum’s collection. Each year countless students of all ages write about works of art on view. Earlier this week on Pi day, a group studied connections between math and architecture and works of art. We invite all teachers to reflect on how our collection can enrich their classroom goals.

Schools and educational institutions all over the country are working to follow both the Common Core Standards set at the national level and their respective state standards in an engaging way that will lead to student success.   These efforts of teachers go hand in hand with the goals of Museums – to develop programming for students that not only meets, but exceeds these standards inviting students to connect to a larger world, the fabric of history, and many perspectives at the art Museum. The Museum hopes more teachers will take the opportunity to use paintings as texts in all of their core subjects. One of my primary goals as a Museum Educator is to support teachers by ensuring that our programming is aligned with the standards the state of Alabama is currently using.

For those not familiar with Common Core State Standards they rely heavily on non-fiction texts and primary sources to teach reading and comprehension skills. While creative writing is beyond the scope of the standards, the core focus on primary sources such as newspapers, journals, and formal documents fit easily with history museum programming. You may wonder how art museums fit in? As an art museum educator I use artworks in two ways that coincide with CCSS. One is a more obvious way and the second is maybe not so apparent.

The CCSS emphasize skills such as deductive reasoning, context clues, and inferences. The visual arts are great for honing all of these skills. Our docents here at the MMFA are trained to guide students through a discussion that gets them to really look at an artwork and derive meaning from what they see. By allowing students to take time to observe and find their own meaning, this encourages further exploration and naturally creates opportunities to solidify comprehension skills such as those mentioned above. Taking this idea one step further is using visual works of art as primary sources such as in the history class mentioned earlier.

Primary sources are by definition artifacts that were created during the time period being studied, whether the source is a document, diary, recording, or an artwork. Take for instance the painting by John Kelly Fitzpatrick called Saturday Morning. Created in 1935, it depicts a ‘snapshot’ of life in a small Alabama town. The artist, we know, was hired to paint regional scenes by the Works Progress Administration, during the Great Depression. Armed with that bit of knowledge we can infer that the artist was most likely painting from his own experience of being in this particular small town and recording what he saw. Now, while the artist may have taken liberties with color and composition we can still derive useful historical and contextual information from this painting by looking at it more closely, for example the juxtaposition of the automobile and smokestack with a mule and cotton cart. Similarly, one can have the same kind of conversation with a portrait. Inferences can be made about the time period by exploring the objects included in the painting as well as clothing, accessories and background features. The sitter’s wealth and fashionable taste is being celebrated in clothing, jewelry, and surroundings in the belle époque portrait Mrs. Louis E. Raphael by John Singer Sargent.

While our educational landscape continues to evolve, museums will continue to engage students in worthwhile programming that will help with skills of comprehension, observation, and critical thinking using myriad connections to all core subjects. As museum educators we strive to create experiences and resources that enrich the lessons in the classroom. The MMFA will continuously adapt our programming to meet the needs of the students to ensure they are given the tools to make connections between what they are learning in the classroom and what they see in our galleries.

Kaci Norman
Assistant Curator of Education
Youth, Family, and Studio Programs

 

Credit Information:

Figure 2: John Kelly Fitzpatrick (American, 1888–1953), Saturday Morning, 1935, oil on masonite, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of Works Progress Administration, 1935.7

Figure 3: John Singer Sargent (American, 1856–1925), Mrs. Louis E. Raphael (Henriette Goldschmidt), ca. 1906, oil on canvas, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, The Blount Collection, 1989.2.3

Five “Greats” chosen by our staff from the MMFA Collection

Short on time while visiting the MMFA? Make sure to check out these pieces for an insight into the variety of the Museum’s collection. All works were marked as favorites by the Museum’s staff!

Click here to download a map with more information on gallery location and audio tour stops.


Blount Collection

Edward Hopper, New York Office, 1962

Top5.HopperNew York Office was painted when Hopper was eighty years old, and very near the end of his life.  But the subject of the painting had occupied the artist since virtually the beginning of his career, combining three major themes he revisited regularly in his art: urban environment, the business office, and a solitary figure viewed through a window from the outside.

Click the title above to read more!

John Singer Sargent, Mrs. Louis Raphael, ca. 1906

Top5.SargentThis portrait depicts the wife of one of the directors of a prominent London Bank, R. Raphael and Sons. The setting is Sargent’s London studio at 31 Tite Street, which is documented in contemporary photographs. Specific accessories such as the sculpture on the mantelpiece as well as those visible in the mirror are known to have been in Sargent’s studio when the portrait was made in about 1906.

Click the title above to read more!

 

 

 

 

 

Karen LaMonte, Ojigi Bowing, 2010

Top5.LamonteFrom afar, Ojigi-Bowing seems to glow from within.  Without a head or hands, it seems almost ghostly.  On closer inspection, the piece reveals the glow to be the overhead light refracting through the hollow interior out through the slightly frosted, but still translucent glass.

Click the title above to read more!

 

 

 

 

 

Gary Chapman, Mutter und Tochter, 1993

Top5.ChapmanThe artist Gary Chapman defines the “attractiveness” of the mother in Mutter und Tochter as based upon his personal experience of powerful, confident women. It his belief that mothers need to be strong role models for their daughters as women continue to strive for full social equality.  This mother embodies the idea of physical strength, as it is portrayed in her defined musculature, and her confident pose.

Click the title above to read more!

 

 

 

Young Gallery

Kelly Fitzpatrick, Negro Baptising, 1930

Top5.NegroBaptisingNegro Baptising is one of the first paintings acquired by the museum, donated by Fitzpatrick, who was a member of the first board of directors and a teacher in the affiliated art school. Like many of his works, it depicts an activity he witnessed in the local rural black community, in this case a traditional river baptism.

Click the title above to read more!

February Makes Its Mark on the MMFA

It’s during the month of February that people tend to reflect on love and happiness. Here at the MMFA, we make it a point to celebrate those special times with you. Here is a list of the events that were created with the community in mind.

Short Course: Alabama Quilts 
Tuesdays: February 14, 21, and 28, at 12 noon

Throughout our state’s history, quilting has brought communities together. Now the MMFA and the Alabama Department of Archives and History have paired quilts from their collections representing similar themes, patterns, and techniques in works created across various times, places, classes, and racial lines. Join us for this short course to learn more about Alabama quilts and explore the exhibition Sewn Together.

Tales for Tots 
Wednesday, February 15, 10:30 to 11 A.M. and 11 to 11:30 A.M.

This FREE monthly program helps develop early learning about art fundamentals as participants engage with storybooks and simple craft activities related to art on display in the galleries.


Putting Together the Pieces: Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use” and Quilting Tradition,
co-hosted by Alabama State University
Thursday, February 16, 6 P.M.

Dr. Jacqueline Trimble, Chairperson of the Department of Languages and Literatures, and Dr. Catherine Gubernatis Dannen, Assistant Professor of English, Alabama State University, will lead a gallery talk in the exhibition Sewn Together: Two Centuries of Alabama Quilts.


Film at the Museum: Basquiat
Thursday, February 23, 5:30 P.M.

Layered with symbols, text, graffiti-like expressions, and references to other creative minds, Jean-Michel Basquiat’s paintings broke auction records for work by an African-American artist and remain highly collectible today. Basquiat, written and directed by painter and filmmaker Julian Schnabel, tells the story of the artist’s short, tragic life, and his meteoric success.

Family Art Affair and Jazz Jams 
Sunday, February 26, 2 P.M.

View the collaborative exhibition Sewn Together: Two Centuries of Alabama Quilts displaying traditional handmade quilts from the collections of both the MMFA and the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Enjoy the studio program replicating quilting styles and themes using textiles and colorful papers to make your own pattern designs to take home! As always, the jazz will be found in the Museum’s Orientation gallery!

Celebrate 200 Years of Quilts in Alabama!

You may have heard that the state of Alabama will be celebrating the bicentennial of statehood for the next three years. Beginning this month and extending through December of 2019, state institutions will feature projects that focus on Alabama’s rich social and cultural heritage. The MMFA’s first exhibition honoring the bicentennial opens this month, and the project reflects a cooperative spirit, ingenuity, and respect for our material culture that is surely worth commemorating.

Blog.Quilts2Sewn Together: Two Hundred Years of Alabama Quilts, now on view at the MMFA until April 16, had its inception at an MMFA staff ‘”pre-opening” visit to the newly completed Alabama Voices installation at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. After our introductory tour, Archives curator Ryan Blocker (pictured to the right) took us to see some special treasures in her care—storage cabinets with rolls of amazing textiles. These examples of linens, costumes, and clothing, some of them centuries old, were part of the Archives’ collections that began back in 1901; it’s the oldest state archives in the United States.

It was natural that Ryan and I began looking at and talking about Alabama quilts. The MMFA has a collection of 82 quilts primarily made in West Alabama from the decades of the 1980s and 1990s. These quilts are a mixture of examples made for practical use in the home and those made consciously as art objects for display.   Some of those in the Archives’ storeroom were created over 150 years ago; they reflect the origins of the quilt as a both a necessary utilitarian object and one that routinely demonstrated the needlecraft and creativity of the maker. The more we looked and talked, the more we discovered fascinating parallels in these quilts that were made in our state from its earliest days until the end of the twentieth century. We were excited to discover patterns, quilting techniques, themes, and methods of construction that reflected the continuity in both our extraordinary collections.

Blog.Quilts1We joined forces to select and interpret 14 exemplary pairs of quilts, composed of one example from each collection, which are now on display on the walls of the MMFA. Many of the older examples from the Archives’ collections have never been formally exhibited. Historic textiles are, by their nature, very fragile objects, and thus are rarely hung on walls or seen under exhibition lighting. We are honored that the Archives chose to share these distinctive and historically significant quilts with us in order to make them accessible to the public.

The two staffs (pictured to the right) joined forces to tell the story of the exhibition through not only text panels but also a printed brochure and an interactive website dedicated to Alabama and its quilt history. The website was largely the creation of Archive staff members Raven Christopher and Georgia Ann Hudson, with timely and creative contributions from our own curatorial digital assets manager, Sarah Graves. The site, sewntogetheralabama.org, will give this collaboration a “second life” on the internet, long past the period of the physical exhibition. It is accessible to quilt lovers the world over, as well as to local collectors and families who treasure their family heirlooms. Among the valuable resources you’ll find on the website are two videos that explain how best to care for your quilts and how to safely store them. It also contains photographs of the quilts paired with their comparative texts explaining the continuity of the quilting tradition in our state and “sneak peeks” at quilts that were too fragile for display in the galleries.

Blog.Quilts3I hope that you will take time before April 16 to come to the Museum to see these extraordinary historic textiles. It may be your only opportunity to see them before they return to their safe storage for future generations. We appreciate all of the staff members of each institution who participated in making the larger project a reality. We are very grateful for the financial support of the Alabama State Council on the Arts, as well as the sponsorship of our long-time patrons and supporters, Laura and Michael Luckett. And be sure to make a virtual visit through the website sewntogetheralabama.org to learn even more about the art of quilt making in Alabama, a tradition two hundred years in the making.

Margaret Lynne Ausfeld
Curator

Fig 1.: Ryan Blocker, curator at ADAH

Fig 2.: (left to right) Margaret Lynne Ausfeld, MMFA curator; Sarah Graves, MMFA digital asset manager; Ryan Blocker, ADAH curator; Georgia Ann Hudson, ADAH PR; and Raven Christopher, ADAH archaeology curator

Fig 3.: (left to right) Staff from ADAH, Georgia Ann Hudson, Ryan Blocker, and Raven Christopher

Meet the MMFA’s Artist in Action Betty Plaster

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts prides itself on the regional artists we showcase in the Museum Store. Quarterly one of those artists is selected to demonstrate their craft for the public during Artist in Action in conjunction with DiVine Lunch. On Thursday, January 19, Betty Plaster will join us as Artist in Action from 12 noon to 2 P.M. in the Store to demonstrate how she creates works of art with beautifully pressed flowers.

We have a wide range of pieces from Betty that include matted 11 x 14 pieces for $40 to large-scale framed works priced at $300. Plaster has been working with flowers for many years but did not start selling her pieces professionally until April 2016. Her business The Rose Walk combines her favorite flower with the manner in which she procures her medium. Plaster said, “Every time I walk outside I am scouting new flowers and leaves to press,” making her keenly observant of her environment.BETTY PLASTER 3 for blog

When asked what are her favorite flowers to press? The artist unequivocally stated it was the rose. Plaster remarked, “My favorite flower to press are roses and especially individual rose petals. One rose bush will produce hundreds of different shades of color.” The geometric organization of her pieces contrasts the randomness of nature in a way that highlights the variance in each petal or pressed flower. Plaster is also acutely aware of the temporal nature of her pieces. She stated, “Each piece I create can never be created again since each flower or petal is unique.” This brings an added dimension to her pieces because you know it is entirely one of a kind. She said the newness of each leaf or petal and the shape it takes after it is pressed makes her most recently finished piece her favorite; she is unable to give top honor to any single work.

When asked what she thought would be the best advice to give people attempting to press and mat flowers themselves Plaster offered, “Always press more flowers than you think you will need for a picture. Some flowers will mold during the pressing process especially if they are picked during days with high humidity.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPlease join us on Thursday, January 19 to meet Betty Plaster, ask her any questions you may have about pressing your own flowers, and purchase her beautiful work. If you would like to join us for DiVine Lunch, reservations are recommended and can be made by calling 334.240.4339. Please click here to view the menu.

Blake Rosen
Special Events Coordinator

A New Year Brings Excitement to the MMFA

With a new year comes more opportunities for the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts. As we enter into 2017, we anticipate that the opening of our winter exhibitions, a free movie screening, and various other events will generate enthusiasm in the River Region.

Take a look at the list of happenings for the month of January.

Film at the Museum: Midnight in Paris
Thursday, January 5, 5:30 P.M.

midnight-in-paris-for-blog

We have heard from film lovers that you would like to see the movie Midnight in Paris. Join us for Woody Allen’s 2011 comedy in which an American writer and tourist in Paris suddenly finds himself in the 1920s–interacting with the likes of Gertrude Stein, Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali, Josephine Baker, the Fitzgeralds, and many other creative luminaries.

First Sundays
Sunday, January 8, 1 P.M.

 

Art Ed Central
Thursday, January 12, 4:30 P.M.

ED.teacher.12callout

Enjoy a gallery talk in a new exhibition at the Museum and experience related lessons to use in your classrooms at this FREE teacher workshop.

DiVine Lunch
Thursday, January 19, 11 A.M.


 

Family Art Affair and Jazz Jams
Sunday, January 22, 2 P.M.

Web.Moonstruck.2016The lunar-inspired exhibition Moonstruck: Works on Paper from the MMFA Collection is sure to inspire you in the studio, where the whole family is welcome to create vivid nighttime scenes using various printmaking techniques.

 

 

Celebrating the Opening of  Sewn Together: Two Centuries of Alabama Quilts and Nature, Tradition & Innovation: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics from the Gordon Brodfuehrer Collection
Thursday, January 26, 5:30 P.M.

 

 

Fleischman Lecture: From Bed to Walls: Quilts as Art
Thursday, January 26, 7 P.M.

Web.Quilt_250x180.2016

Following the opening of Sewn Together: Two Centuries of Alabama Quilts, Jennifer Swope, Assistant Curator, David and Roberta Logie Department of Textile and Fashion Arts at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston will explore the work of Alabama and other American quilters in the context of their transformation from bed covers to art.

 

 

 

 

Credit Information:
Figure 1: Thomas Hart Benton (American, 1889–1975), Huck Finn, from the Missouri State Capitol Mural Series, 1936, lithograph on paper, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Luther Hill in memory of William Convington, 1969.13

Figure 2: Mallory and Welch Families, Mount Ida Wedding Quilt, 1851, cotton, Lent by the Alabama Department of Archives and History, Montgomery, Alabama, ADAH, 86.1457.1

A Year in Review

At the end of 2016, we at the MMFA are looking back at fond memories around the museum and with our members. Below is a throwback to the top 10 blog posts of 2016, listed by date, just click the titles to read more.

Enjoy, and here’s to a happy new year in 2017!

1. Reflections on the 60th Anniversary of the Montgomery Bus Boycott

An Expressive EveningIn partnership with the Rosa Parks Library and Museum, the MMFA welcomed students from Alabama State University, Auburn University at Montgomery, Huntingdon College, and Tuskegee University who presented Honoring the Montgomery Bus Boycott: An Evening of Artistic Celebration in the…

2. Adventures in Collecting American Art— “Albano, Italy” (ca. 1874-1876)

The MMFA’s exhibition Adventures in Collecting Art was an assemblage of twenty-seven works, including twelve Charles and Babette Wampold had previously gifted the Museum’s collection over a period of twenty-four years…

3. Art Auction 2016 

Art Auction 2016, a biennial fundraising event, proved to be one of the most memorable in both a SMART and historical sense for the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts. For the first time ever…

4. A Shared Legacy—Folk Art in America

SL.CatCoverBLOGSome of the most distinctive and widely collected American art today is admired for the simple fact that it is simple.  Compared with the rarified, highly refined arts and architecture of Western Europe, and the ancient productions of many other continents, centuries, and civilizations, American 19thcentury folk art generally looks, well, plain.  And that’s exactly what has made everyday people and art collectors since the early 20th century love it…

5. The Road to Crystal Bridges

If you have an interest in American art and history, you have likely heard of the greatest art museum and collection built in the U.S. in recent memory.  Located in the small Arkansas town of Bentonville…

6. The 27th Annual Flimp Festival

A spell of great weather accompanied by a strong camaraderie between the MMFA and Booker T. Washington Magnet High School contributed to the 2016 Flimp Festival making a lasting impression on…

7. Summer Exhibitions Opening Reception 2016

Blog.Harshman.SummerOpening2016Summertime is always a welcome season at the Museum—the galleries offer a cool respite from the heat and our staff takes a mini-break from the nonstop activities of the fall and spring. Nevertheless, there’s plenty to see and do at the MMFA…

8. Women Making Art: A Panel Discussion

With creativity and innovation women artists have been involved in art making throughout the centuries. Yet, despite their efforts, traditional art history narratives often misrepresent, under-represent, and marginalize…

9. The MMFA Pays Tribute to the Military

Blog.MilitaryOpenHouse3As someone who has several loved ones and friends in the military, I know it can be difficult to pack up, move your family to a different city, and start over. That’s why we, at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, do our part each year to let all current and former military members and their immediate families know they are appreciated…

 

10. Meet Federico Uribe!

blog-uribe7-2016A lively giraffe made of colored pencils, a two-story tree made of khaki pants, a dazzling pond made of CDs – all of this and more can be found in an immersive and dreamlike exhibit created by Federico Uribe. Uribe transforms ordinary, everyday objects into extraordinary sculptures…

 

 

 

 

 

Images above:

Fig1: From Honoring the Montgomery Bus Boycott: An Evening of Artistic Celebration

Fig2: From A Shared Legacy

Fig3: From Summer Exhibitions Opening and Women Making Art

Fig4: From The MMFA Pays Tribute to the Military

Fig5: From Meet Federico Uribe!

 

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