Open Today 10am-9pm

Montgomery Museum of Fine Art

Click to view hours
Open Today 10am-9pm
Click to view calendar

Category: General

Meet Federico Uribe!

blog-uribe4-2016A lively giraffe made of colored pencils, a two-story tree made of khaki pants, a dazzling pond made of CDs – all of this and more can be found in an immersive and dreamlike exhibit created by Federico Uribe. Uribe transforms ordinary, everyday objects into extraordinary sculptures of the natural world. The Muses Teen Council was fortunate enough to experience a first-hand viewing of Federico Uribe: Transformart and conducted a personal interview with the artist.

Uribe’s artistic philosophy consists of more than just making statements, but instead creating feelings and beauty. He simultaneously imbues his own image and background in his art and attempts to evoke the same self-discovery in the viewer. Uribe grew up in Colombia on a farm and experienced a difficult childhood, but he found an escape through drawing. Colored pencils hold a special place in Uribe’s heart as a means to a personal childhood escape. This material is a common medium of his, and he believes every child can relate to drawing with colored pencils as a creative escape.

blog-uribe6-2016Uribe studied painting as a young adult, enjoying the Renaissance style until an exploration of his identity allowed him to discover a more contemporary artistic voice. Through his growth, Uribe reverted to valuing child-like wonder over the pretension and lack of originality he found in aspects of the art world. This free-spirited nature shone through in his wardrobe—plaid slacks with running shoes and a sports jacket—and posture, leaning nonchalantly across a cart as we interviewed him.

blog-uribe7-2016He offered some valuable advice for young artists: don’t procrastinate, don’t read art magazines, and don’t be pretentious. Working hard is natural to Uribe who works 10 hours a day 6 days a week, walking the beach and cycling on his free day. The Muses found inspiration in his confident self-expression and diligent work ethic to encourage us along our own artistic journeys. Thank you for letting us into your world Federico.


Written By MUSES Members: Cael Barragan, Marlee Bryant, Mikaela, Enriquez Shelly Lim, Gracie Moore, Hailey Palmer, Carson Scott, Meili Wang


To learn more about teen programs at the MMFA, contact Alice Novak 240-4361

Last Call/Art in Concert

last-call-septThe Junior Executive Board of the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts welcomed more than 100 young professionals to Last Call on September 1 in conjunction with the exhibition Photorealism. Guests sampled IPA and Pilsner from Railyard Brewing Company. They also dined on Red Beans and Rice and Jambalaya from The Seafood Bistro. All were encouraged to purchase raffle tickets for a chance to win a stock the cellar prize package or VIP tickets to Art in Concert that will be held on Friday, October 14, 2016. The JEB raised more than $600 to support the Artist in Residency Program–Learning Through Art at Wares Ferry Road featuring the likes of Barbara Davis and Darius Hill.

AIC16_OnExhibit ad_3x4Looking to the fall, the JEB is very excited to announce Daniel Elsworth and the Great Lakes as the featured band for the 5th annual Art in Concert.  Previous artists have included St. Paul and the Broken Bones and The FUTUREBIRDS. For the first time, there will be a VIP Tent sponsored by Pine Bar and Vintage Year offering free food and drink to those who purchase a $50 VIP ticket. General admission tickets are $15. All tickets can be purchased in advance here. We will be selling general admission tickets at the gate the night of the event. As always, this event is rain or shine! Please bring blankets and chairs, but no outside food or drink. Both will be available during the concert for purchase using either cash or card. Make sure to follow the JEB on Facebook (MMFA Junior Executive Board) and Instagram (mmfajuniorboard) for updates on food vendors, band information, and ticket flash sales!

last-call-sept-2-2Are you interested in joining the JEB?  The Junior Executive Board works to advocate the programs of the MMFA to young professionals in the River Region. Through significant fundraising events, the JEB supports major exhibitions and the Education Department of the MMFA. We are always looking for new faces to be part of this board of young people. If you would like to be considered for the 2017 board, please submit a cover letter and resume to Blake Rosen between October 1 and November 11  via email at The new board will be announced December 1.

We hope to see everyone October 14 for Art in Concert!

Blake Rosen
Special Events Coordinator

Join us for Collectors Society 2016–17

blog-collectorssociety2Along with the beautiful days of fall, many MMFA members also look forward to a new Collectors Society season.  The annual program combines several excursions around the Southeast with luncheon lectures at the Museum – all with a focus on collecting art and art collections. During the spring there will also be a chance for Collectors Society members to make art – ceramic vessels inspired by the exhibition Nature, Tradition, and Innovation: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics.

In fact, many of the Collectors Society activities this year are dedicated to creations by living artists.  We will kick off with a visit from Federico Uribe, whose installations made of everyday materials will be featured in the MMFA exhibition Federico Uribe:Transformart.  We will also be presented with wearable works of art made of everyday materials when we hear from MMFA Artist Market featured artist Kathleen Nowak Tucci.  The Birmingham Museum of Art will illuminate us further in the exhibition Third Space/shifting conversations about contemporary art.

blog-collectorssociety1At the same time, with all of the wonders of contemporary art, we might pause to ask whether we are losing touch with tradition?  Spalding Nix of Spalding Nix Fine Art in Atlanta will address the topic with “Millennials Don’t Polish Silver.”  But back to that beautiful fall weather, you won’t want to miss Dale Chihuly’s stunning glass works in Chihuly in the Garden at the Atlanta Botanical Garden.

We hope you will join Collectors Society today; we are waiting for you! For a full listing of events or to register, please click here.


Alice Novak
Curator of Education


The MMFA Pays Tribute to the Military

Blog.MilitaryOpenHouse3As someone who has several loved ones and friends in the military, I know it can be difficult to pack up, move your family to a different city, and start over. That’s why we, at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, do our part each year to let all current and former military members and their immediate families know they are appreciated.  The Museum is hosting its free annual Military Open House on Thursday, August 25, from 5:30 to 7:30 P.M.

You never know who you might meet. Last year, 96-year-old World War II and Korean War veteran, Roscoe Brannon, came in for the event. Before leaving, he gave me a quick hug and said, “I loved it. I am glad my granddaughter brought me here.” Priceless moments like that one are bound to occur this year.

MMFA Museum Director Mark Johnson remarked, “We value the contributions made by the Maxwell and Gunter communities. This family-oriented activity allows us the opportunity to express our gratitude for the commitment and sacrifices made by our military neighbors and friends.”

Blog.MilitaryOpenHouse2Everyone enjoys art-making activities in our studios and exploring the MMFA’s summer exhibitions and permanent collections through docent-led tours. ARTWORKS, our interactive interpretive galleries, will be open too. Entertainment for the evening will be provided by the always popular Lo-Fi Loungers. The band is known for playing hits and misses of the pre-World War II era, and they also venture into the 50’s and 60’s.

Our guests for the evening will also enjoy an outstanding buffet generously provided by Wintzell’s Oyster House. The dinner menu includes fried fish, coleslaw, hush puppies, macaroni and cheese, and dessert.

Please come out and help us make this 21st year of Military Open House one to remember. We, the board and staff of the MMFA, will be waiting to greet everyone who walks through the door. We hope to see you there! For more information, please call the Museum at 334.240.4333.


The Museum greatly appreciates the co-sponsorship of Wintzell’s Oyster House. 

Cynthia Milledge
Director of Marketing & Public Relations





Women Making Art: A Panel Discussion

Blog.BendolphAs seen in the current exhibition Women’s Work (on view until September 18), the contributions made by women artists to the history of art are significant. With creativity and innovation women artists have been involved in art making throughout the centuries. Yet, despite their efforts, traditional art history narratives often misrepresent, under-represent, and marginalize these artists. Professor and feminist art historian Linda Nochlin addressed these problems in her 1971 ArtNews article, when she posed the question, Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? In the 45 years since Nochlin first asked the question, has anything changed?

Blog.HaglerBlog.WrightOn Thursday, August 18, at 6 P.M., urban photographer Lynn Saville, sculptor Rachel Wright, figurative painter Elana Hagler, and textile artist Louisiana Bendolph will be at the Museum to debate this issue in the FREE panel discussion Women Making Art. Drawing on personal experience, each of these artists will reflect on her diverse ways of working, the path of her artistic career, and what it means to be a woman in the art world. They will share their own dealings with gender bias while describing how they developed individual and strong voices in their chosen mediums.

Blog.SavilleFollowing the panel discussion, please join Lynn Saville as she signs copies of her book Dark City: Urban America at Night, which accompanies her exhibition of the same name (on view until September 25). Additionally, at 7 P.M. on Wednesday, August 17, the day before the panel, Saville will speak about her photographs within the exhibition. After her FREE gallery talk she will lead a twilight photography workshop in downtown Montgomery. Please call 334.240.4365 or email for more information about any or all of these events or to register for Saville’s workshop. We hope to see you and to celebrate all of these inventive, creative, and inspiring women artists.


Jennifer Jankauskas

Curator of Art


Credit Information:

Figure 1: Louisiana Bendolph (American), Three Squares, 2005, color aquatint and spitbite aquatint etching with chine collie, image lent by the artist

Figure 2: Rachel Wright (American), Luna Skull, 2016, blown and kiln formed glass, steel, and copper, image lent by the artist

Figure 3: Elana Hagler (American, born Israel), Debra, 2015, oil on linen, image lent by the artist, In the collection of Luke and Debra Ritter

Figure 4: Lynn Saville (American, born 1950), Brooklyn Bridge Park Construction, Brooklyn, NY, 2006, archival digital print from a digital original, Photograph courtesy of the artist


Blog.PhotorealismgalleryThe first thing you notice about the new Photorealism exhibition is the big, bold, colorful images of planes and motorcycles, movie marquees, and cityscapes. The show includes only 20 items and fills only two galleries, but it is an eyeful. Indeed, there is more than meets the eye’s initial inspection. Each image invites close looking.

Some viewers may marvel at the images’ high degree of mimesis—the fidelity with which they mimic their subject. The vivid array of reflections in the cowl of a motorcycle, the nuanced shades of grey enveloping the fuselage of a P-51 Mustang sitting under an overcast sky, the glittering gold and patriotic colors of a Fourth of July still-life composition impress viewers with their detailed representation of reality. But it is not immediately apparent that these pictures do not mimic three-dimensional reality. These are pictures of photographs—primarily photos of motorcycles, airplanes, movie marquees, and other urban imagery—hence the exhibition title, Photorealism, and the name of the style that took root in 1960s Pop Art.

Blog.Empire.PhotorealismThat’s right. Photorealist artists paint pictures of photographs. First they photograph places like banal urban views and things like cars, trucks, and other macho machines. Then they project those images onto canvas or paper, trace the forms, and fill in the colors, often with airbrushes that capture the fuzzy effects of soft-focus lenses and out of focus photos. Photorealists often crop their images to make the most of abstract design compositions, but the results always look realistic, even if artists like Robert Cottingham take some creative license with the isolation or modification of their images as he does with movie marquees like that of the now demolished Empire Theatre that once stood in downtown Montgomery (fig. 2, above). Still, the subject of the photograph remains recognizable in every Photorealist painting or print.

Photorealist prints are much more common than Photorealist paintings, which typically require many months to complete. However, Photorealist prints are similarly time-consuming to create because each usually involves a dozen or more individual screens—one for each color. One print by Tom Blackwell (whose Triumph Trumpet and 451 are in this show) required 86 separate screens and took 15 months to make. That print, Shatzi (1979), depicts a World War II aircraft and was printed on Masonite (as is Ron Kleeman’s Mustang Sally in this exhibition) because of its great scale (4 x 6 feet). It was printed by Norman Lassiter, a master printer who partnered with Louis Meisel, a New York gallery owner, to publish Photorealist prints under the aegis of Editions Lassiter-Meisel.

Editions Lassiter-Meisel also published the ten silkscreens in the City-ScapBlog.CityscapesPortfolioes Portfolio (fig. 3, to the right) that are on view in the current exhibition. Most are signed and numbered A.P. 21/30, indicating that they were the 21st of 30 artist proofs pulled in addition to 25 publisher’s proofs plus the full edition of 250. Signed and numbered print editions of this scale enabled Photorealists to sell images of their paintings for substantially less than the original paintings cost. Relatively large editions like this one also enabled Meisel to donate a few of the portfolios to museums—as he did for our museum.

So, when you go to see the new Photorealist show, don’t get blown away by the big, bold, colorful images. Take time to look closely at these prints. It’s a little like a summer “staycation,” enjoying the everyday sights without leaving the air-conditioned comfort of your hometown museum.

Michael Panhorst
Curator of Art


Image Credits
Figure 2: Robert Cottingham, Empire, 2009, screen print on paper, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of the artist, 2009.12

Figure 3: Colophon and Preface, from the portfolio, City-Scapes, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Gift of Louis K. and Susan P. Meisel, 2014.5.8

Last Call Draws a Great Crowd

Last Call Crowd Blog Photo 6.9.16The Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Junior Executive Board hosted its first Last Call of 2016 in conjunction with A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America. The JEB was one of the lead sponsors for the exhibit and was very excited to bring the young professional community out to see the show before it closed.

Almost 100 people attended the lively event on Thursday, June 9 that included food provided by On A Roll and sampled spirits from John Emerald Distillery based in Opelika, AL. While the event took place in the Rotunda, partygoers were encouraged to peruse the galleries and take a last chance to see the amazing show. For some at the event, this was their first time at the Museum, and all were very impressed with the temporary exhibit, our permanent collection items as well as the event itself.

Last Call Blog #3A favorite component of Last Call events has been the raffle with all money raised going directly to the MMFA’s Education Department. Our guests were able to raise over $600 attempting to win a stock the cellar package and four VIP tickets to Art in Concert in October. The funds will provide scholarships for Summer Camp at the Museum to well deserving kids and help to fund the receptions on Fridays where the children can display their artwork.

LastCall Blog #2If you were not able to make it last week, please mark your calendar for Thursday, September 1 at 5:30 P.M. when we will be hosting our second Last Call of the year. The event is free and open to all young professionals in the River Region. For more information on the Junior Executive Board check us out on our Facebook page, MMFA Junior Executive Board or follow us on Instagram under the handle mmfajuniorboard. You can learn more about Art in Concert taking place on October 14th and featured band Daniel Ellsworth and the Great Lakes by visiting our website

Interested in joining the Junior Executive Board? We will begin accepting applications for the 2017 board on October 1, 2016. Please submit a cover letter and resume to Jill Barry at or call 334.240.4350 for more information.

Blake Rosen
Special Events Coordinator

Class of 2016 Docents Graduate Thursday Evening

For teachers and students, it’s nearing the end of another school year, and graduation is in the air!  It’s no different for our MMFA docent corps, who will this Thursday evening, May 12, see their newest members graduate from the New Docent Program into the ranks of our talented active, senior docents.  The docents of the 2015-16 class have already participated in Outreach, Studio, Artworks, and gallery tours, and have made their year-end presentations to the Museum staff and active docents. Those presentations were innovative, enlightening, and entertaining, and we are looking forward to incorporating this diverse and talented group into the active docent corps.

My conversations with the members of the 2015-16 docent class are summarized below:

Maria Freedman docentMaria Freedman

Maria came to Montgomery in 1995, by way of Germany and Illinois. She was an art teacher for 40 years, and, during that time, taught a weekend workshop for children at the MMFA and participated annually in the Flimp Festival. She retired in May 2015, and is looking forward to having more time to work on her own art, but, she says, she still needs structure in her day, so in addition to being a new docent, she assists with the Respite Program at First United Methodist Church and is a member of the Selma Art Guild.

Frank Gitschier2 docent-smallFrank Gitschier

A graduate of the University of Louisville, where he was a second string All-American football player, Frank spent 34 years working for the Alabama Legislative Fiscal Office before retiring in 2012. Alice Novak and Jill Barry, whom he met at a dinner party, recruited him into the docent program. A firm believer in the maxim that “a picture is worth a 1,000 words,” he loves leading gallery talks, but is scared (he claims) of leading a studio lesson.

Meg Hall DocentMeg Hall

Before moving to Montgomery in 1996, Meg, who has a master’s degree in social work, lived in Wisconsin and in Auburn, working with children, disabled persons, and the elderly. She also earned a second-degree black belt in karate. In Montgomery, she worked in the Golf Shop at Wynlakes Country Club. Just as she was leaving her employment there, she heard about the docent program from Alice Novak’s friend Foad, a massage therapist at Mind and Body Holistic Spa in Cloverdale. Meg’s favorite part of the docent program is the people. She loves working with children, and helping with Artworks and studio activities.

Evelyn Jackson docent
Evelyn Jackson

Evelyn has operated several small businesses centered on flowers and plants. Now she is a Spanish language interpreter and translator. She says that she needed – and found – a new direction in her life when a friend recommended the docent program to her. Not surprisingly for someone with a degree in English literature, she believes that art is evocative of the range of human experience, and she finds herself looking at art in verbal terms.

Nam Kim docentNam Jung Kim

With a master’s degree in business administration, Nam spent 20 years in marketing. When she and her family moved to Montgomery, she visited the Museum and found it to be a “peaceful and comfortable” place. She called Alice, offering to do marketing work for the Museum and was persuaded to become a docent, which, she said, has turned out to be a wonderful way of getting to know Americans and being part of a community.



Wanica Means docentWanica Means

After living in San Francisco during her working life (which included being a model), Wanica moved to Montgomery to be near family and to be in a place where the cost of living was reasonable.   She reinvented herself by starting an etiquette consulting firm and, along with active docent Phyllis Hall, formed a women’s social club – “Fit and Fun and Fifty Plus.” When Phyllis suggested that she become a docent, Wanica responded, “Free art history class every week? Count me in!” Like Nam, she has found a sense of community in the docent program.

Nicki Rupe 2-docent smallNicki Rupe

Before coming to Alabama, Nicki spent most of her years in California, where she served as the executive secretary to CEOs of biotech companies and to Senator Dianne Feinstein. Here in Montgomery, she has re-launched a business, begun in California, as a professional organizer and home stager. She has always considered playing a role in an art museum, perhaps because she understands that she, like an artist with a blank canvas, “has a passion to create something beautiful from what seems like mayhem.” She believes that the docent program has given her a more discerning eye to appreciate the masterpieces that grace walls of the Museum and she is grateful that the MMFA reaches out to the community to share its treasures.

Marilyn Simpson docentMarilyn Simpson

Marilyn spent 42 years in higher education in California, Virginia, and Alabama. When she left the Alabama Cooperative Extension Service in 2001, she resolved to start on her bucket list, part of which was to become a museum docent. During her travels, she had visited many museums and had found them to be lovely, well-maintained places filled with beautiful things. She decided that her retirement years were going to be surrounded by beauty and the docent program has helped her accomplish that goal. She says, “What could be better than a year filled with a free education in art and beauty?

Gretchen Sippial docentGretchen Sippial

Alice’s friend Foad at Mind and Body Holistic Spa recruited Gretchen’s husband to be a docent, and, when her husband indicated that he was not interested, Gretchen jumped at the chance. (Sounds like Foad should be an honorary docent!). Despite having an undergraduate degree in art, she was not inspired, she says, by her own work and decided to pursue other careers – in management, construction, and higher education. Now, however, she has come full circle and is inspired by the art she is learning about here at the MMFA.


Carroll Thompson docentCarroll Thompson 

Carroll was born and raised in Memphis and is a graduate of Rhodes College (formerly Southwestern at Memphis), where she majored in fiber arts. Her three lifelong interests have been theater, dance, and art. She has taught ballet and loves doing art projects with children. She came to the docent program through her friend, active docent Carol Tew. Carroll loves “art history Mondays” and enjoys being part of the docent community at the MMFA .

Congratulations to all the members of the MMFA’s 2015-16 docent class and we warmly welcome them to our active membership.

Mary Lil Owens
New Docent Representative






The Road to Crystal Bridges

Blog.CrysBridg.CathedralGroupIf you have an interest in American art and history, you have likely heard of the greatest art museum and collection built in the U.S. in recent memory.  Located in the small Arkansas town of Bentonville, the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (as well as the surrounding grounds and nearby town) give new meaning to the term “art environment.”  On the weekend of April 15 to 17, a group of MMFA patrons, docents, and staff set off to explore this amazing destination.  And, while it’s not an easy spot to access (either by air or land), it is well worth the journey. Pictured is the group at the Cooper Memorial Chapel (front to back, left to right): Margaret Lynne Ausfeld, Connie Morrow, Emilie Reid, Connor Carraway, Jim Barganier, Pete Land, Bill Little, Joan Loeb, Jane Barganier, Liz Land, Mary Lil Owens, and Alice Novak.

Blog.CrysBridg.SculptureJust a bit of background.  The concept of constructing a museum of American art in Bentonville was the brainchild and mission of Alice Walton, who is the daughter of Walmart, Inc. founder Sam Walton.  Bentonville was the small-town home of the original store, and it remains the site of the corporate headquarters.  Alice and her siblings were raised in Bentonville, and they spent their childhoods playing on the nearby property that has been converted into Crystal Bridges (named for Crystal Spring that traverses the landscape.)  Many in the art world power centers were bemused by this Southerner’s determination to purchase a collection of great American art (from scratch) and donate it to a public institution in rural Arkansas. However, art tourists from all over the country are now making the pilgrimage to experience the remarkable result. At the outset, Alice Walton proceeded to allocate her own funds, and raise other funds necessary, to create what is today a magnificent collection, with great works of art from the 18th to the 21st centuries.  The MMFA group enjoyed discussions of only a fraction of the masterpieces in the collection including Asher B. Durand’s Kindred Spirits and Norman Rockwell’s Rosie the Riveter. Blog.CrysBridg.Museum

The art in Crystal Bridges is chronologically installed in a structure designed around water by the Boston-based architect Moshe Safdie.  Sited in the midst of acres of what can best be described as “landscaped woodlands,” a visit to Crystal Bridges is an experience of both artistic and natural beauty.  There are 3 miles of trails that allow the visitor to experience an assortment of flowering trees, plants, and outdoor sculpture.  The museum grounds are also home to a Sky Space installation titled The Way of Color (2009) by the artist James Turrell, and a re-located Usonian home, The Bachman-Wilson House (1954) by Frank Lloyd Wright, both of which the group enjoyed during the weekend.

The group stayed at the 21c Museum Hotel located off the square in downtown Bentonville​.  The hotel hosts changing exhibitions of contemporary art, and the creative environment extends to the excellent food in the hotel restaurant, the Hive.  From 21c it’s​ a pleasant 20-minute walk through the woodlands to​ the museum.  An additional excursion to E. Fay Jones’ Mildred B. Cooper Memorial Chapel continued the theme of stunning art and architecture in the natural setting of Northwest Arkansas.    Blog.CrysBridg.ArtTalk 

Like a fine jewel nestled in an equally precious setting, it is the collection of American art that draws the visitor to Crystal Bridges, and the centerpiece of any visit will be the works of art on view in the Museum’s chronological installation.  Alice Walton’s vision was to create a collection of great works (which of course these days requires expenditures in the millions of dollars) with a far reaching educational mission, and she and the museum staff have made that vision a reality.  Featuring an assemblage ranging from Colonial and Federal portraits by painters such as John Singleton Copley and Gilbert Stuart, to twenty-first century installation works by sculptors such as Louise Bourgeois and Felix Gonzales-Torres, the collection rivals those of the major art museums in America—and it’s still growing.

We thank those that joined us for this adventure:​ Jane and Jim Barganier, Liz and Pete Land, Joan Loeb, Connie Morrow and her son Connor Carraway, Mary Lil Owens and Bill Little, and Emilie Reid.  We also thank Alice Walton, whose passion for American art and her hometown have​ created the ultimate synthesis of art and nature in America’s heartland.


Alice Novak
Curator of Education

Margaret Lynne Ausfeld
Curator of Paintings and Sculpture

Director’s Circle Dinner 2016


The Director’s Circle Dinner is my favorite night at the Museum. Once a year we gather our most dedicated supporters for a “thank you” dinner. This group collectively provides over $400,000 that directly supports the Museum’s exhibition, education, and acquisition programs.  We quite literally could not do what we do with out them.

Blog.DCDinner.Group1This year, showing true dedication, 150 Circle members fought the terrific rainstorms to join director Mark Johnson and his wife Amy, along with our hosts,  Gene and Ray Ingram of Jack Ingram Motors & Mercedes-Benz USA, Inc. and Margaret and Jimmy Lowder of The Colonial Company (pictured above) for a delicious dinner in the Museum’s Lowder Gallery.

During brief remarks, Mark, along with MMFA President Roger Spain, Sculpture Garden Committee Chair Barrie Harmon, and Mayor Todd Strange shared with the crowd some of the Museum’s most recent accomplishments. These include planning for the new Sculpture Garden, as well as the acquisition of a major painting by Thomas Hart Benton, Ozark Autumn, 1949, for the permanent collection.

Blog.DCDinner.Mark&Group1As guests left the warm and spring-like atmosphere of the dinner to venture back into the Montgomery weather, they took a small pot containing seeds as a “thank you” for helping us grow. Because of Directors Circle consistent support, the Museum continues to thrive.


Jill Barry
, Deputy Director


Older Posts:

Page 1 of 1012345...10...Last »