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Category: Events & Music

41st Montgomery Art Guild Museum Exhibition Opens

 

Blog.ArtGuildThe 41st Montgomery Art Guild Museum Exhibition opened Friday night, June 12, with a festive reception attended by more than 400 people. The highlight of the evening was the announcement of 24 awards worth a total of $22,645. The Museum appreciates the work that Thornton Clark, the Art Guild’s show chair, has done to raise the money for these awards, encouraging the participation of so many accomplished artists. Museum Director Mark Johnson said, “We are also grateful to the many generous supporters, including the Museum’s 2014 Junior Executive Board, Sterling Bank, and Margaret Berry Lowder, who helped to sponsor this exhibition.”Blog.ArtGuild2015

The juror, Tom Butler, Director Emeritus of the Columbus (GA) Museum, selected 97 items from 427 entries by 127 artists. 38 artists entered for the first time, and 27 of those first-timers were among the 74 artists selected. Butler also presented the following awards (dimensions are in inches, height before width before depth). (At right: Director Mark Johnson and Juror Tom Butler.)

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$3000 Noble Seay Jones Best In Show Award
Chie A. Hitchner, Unfolding, Weaving (108×28) (At left: Best-in-Show winner Chie A. Hitchner)
$2500 MMFA Director’s Award
Cicely Hulett, Genesis, Mixed media (48×48)
$1000 AUM College of Arts and Sciences Award
Dale Lewis, Heart of Gold, Wood and metal (30x9x9)
$1000 Thornton and Pat Clark Award
Lindy Bruggink, Casey in Black, Oil on panel (17×14)

 

 

$1000 Doster Award
Larry Percy, KERYGMA SERIES: Journeys to Holy Ghost Canyon XX/Dodged Bullet: Incident
401, Saggar fired earthenware, charred wood, concrete (53x19x14)
$1000 Kelly Fitzpatrick Award
Pamela Wesley Copeland, Rouen Nights, Oil (30×24)
$1000 Foy Gilmore Goodwyn Memorial Fund Award
Sheri Schumacher, Margins, Mixed media textiles (50×38)
$1000 Halvorson Award
Kate Seawell, Cadmium Orange, Mixed media monotype (24×32)
$1000 Moore Wealth Management Award
Michael Vaughn Sims, Mount Carmel, Mixed media (33x22x20)
$1000 Edward L. Robbins Award
Joan DiLaura, Irises, Mixed media, (28×22)
$1000 Jimmie Sabel Award
Richard Mills, The Poletoads Nesting in Lucerne, Watercolor, gouache, collage (40×50)
$1000 Vivian Butler Scott Award
Amber Hall, Tornado Aftermath at Lake Martin East I, Oil on canvas (30×60)
$1000 Chuck Whitehead Award for Figurative or Portrait Art
Scott Crockett, Self-Portrait, Graphite (27×21)
$500 2014 MMFA Junior Executive Board First-Time Entrant Award
Warren Simons, Palm Tree Repairs, Digital inkjet print on paper (33×24)
$500 Vincent Cappelluzzo Award for Figurative or Portrait Art
Cecile W. Morgan, Different Drummer, Oil (33×27)
$500 Doug’s 2 Award
Virginia Wolfe, Out to Paint the Town Red, Watercolor (26×22)
$500 The Sandra Hicks Larson Award
Donna Pickens, Variations on the Ladder Theme, Charcoal, conti, collage, graphite (20×27)
$500 McKenzie Award
Margaret Gluhman, Journey: Unknown, Collage (20×16)
$500 Midstate Advertising Award
Darrell C. Warr, Blue Haze, Oil (25×29)
$500 Terrell Stokes Award
Carol Barksdale, Indigo Vibes, Mixed media (24×36)
$500 Clark Walker Award
Rachael Sherer, Rodrigo, Oil (48×24)

Three Art Galleries and Artists of the South Advertisement Awards Donated by AGAS Publishing
Kay Alkire Brummal, Depth Perception, Color photograph on paper (24×28)
Ken Lever, Bow-Legged, Wood, (12x20x14) (At right)
Don Norris, Carpenter Romanesque, Monroe County, Alabama, Digital inkjet print on paper, (23×16)ArtGuild.Blog3

The MMFA and the Montgomery Art Guild’s partnership has again produced an outstanding exhibition representing the best contemporary art in the River Region.

Michael Panhorst
Curator of Art

Do-Dah is a Parade with a Purpose

Do-Dah.kids.blogWhen the MMFA moved from downtown Montgomery to the Blount Cultural Park in 1988, the staff began preparing for a park-and-art-centered outdoor event—a plan that came to fruition 18 months later as the Flimp Festival on May 5, 1990.  We introduced the Do-Dah Parade as a central part of those early Flimps, and it grew to include a diverse assortment of wonderful pets in costume, and some adventurous owners who dressed up as well.

Do-Dah.Lennox.blogThe original Do-Dah parades were eventually discontinued, however in 2014 a number of factors led the Museum to revive the Do-Dah tradition.  First, the Hannah Daye Ridling Bark Park opened in 2013 providing dogs and their families a safe place to play.  Then, in 2014, the Museum entered into a partnership with the Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts to present the annual Flimp Festival, and we jointly approached the Montgomery Humane Society (sponsors of our Bark Park neighbors) to re-institute the Do-Dah tradition.  Our goals were to incorporate the BTW students as co-organizers and participants, and to bring greater visibility to the efforts of the Montgomery Humane Society to find loving families for shelter dogs. We continued this new tradition of Do-Dah at this year’s Flimp, and we are delighted to report that our participation grew.Do-Dah.awards.blog

About fifty amazing dog and their human companions gathered on a perfect May morning to strut their stuff, and compete for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd-place gift cards generously donated by
Pet Supermarket.  The Parade was led by Jazz band musicians from BTW, and our judges, Alabama News Network anchor Tim Lennox and Museum Director Mark Johnson, awarded prizes to winners who achieved the most creative costumes and ensembles.   Students from BTW escorted 10 costumed dogs from the Montgomery Humane Shelter in the Parade, and later presented them to potential adoptive families in the adoption tent from 11 A.M. to 2 P.M. The folks at For Healthy Pets provided gift packets of healthful and tasty products for adopters that day.

Do-Dah.pup.blogWe appreciate all the participants who made this second revival of the Do-Dah Parade and Adoption Event a great success—musicians, parading dogs and people, judges, and volunteers.  We particularly thank the BTW student escorts, and the volunteers from the Montgomery Humane Society who took such good care of the shelter dogs for the day.  Finally, we again thank our sponsors Pet Supermarket, For Healthy Pets, Barking Lot Grooming Salon, and Groomin’ Tails Pet Salon for their sponsorship of prizes for the Do-Dah Parade, and for contributing to the on-going welfare of pets in the Montgomery area.

Margaret Lynne Ausfeld
Curator of Art

The Flimp Festival Draws in a Record-Breaking Crowd

FlimpartsandcraftsLast Saturday, May 2, proved to be one of the most memorable dates in the Flimp Festival’s history. When everyone arrived at Blount Cultural Park, the friendly faces of the Booker T. Washington Magnet High School teachers, students, and Museum staff greeted them. This accompanied by great weather made it a perfect setting for our 2700 guests.

The annual event kicked off at 10 A.M. with registration for the Do-Dah Parade. This year, we had nearly 50 people and their dogs dressed in costumes marching to the tune of “When the Saints go Marching In,” led by BTW’s jazz band. At the end of the parade, three lucky winners received awards for the best ensembles. The Montgomery Humane Society also brought in 10 dogs in hopes of finding them permanent homes.FlimpDo-Dah

FlimpChalkartOur Sidewalk Chalk Art competition was another main attraction at the Festival. The MMFA used the theme “Montgomery: The Past, Present and Future.” There were more than 70 entries in the student and adult categories. What a fantastic display of talent!

The arts and crafts proved to be the most popular of all. Visitors got a chance to make hats, get their faces painted, create creatures like ladybugs with clay, or shape copper into jewelry. Dave Holland, a non-traditional artist and musician, received rave reviews after encouraging the audience to be a part of his percussion session.

Voices of BTW’s choir and the music from the school’s band could be heard throughout the Blount Cultural Park. As the Flimp Festival came to an end, we saw many families taking pictures capturing memories of another great year at the MMFA.Flimpband

Cynthia Milledge
Director of Marketing and Public Relations

 

Native American Family Day 2015

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We held Poarch: History in Motion, our second Native American Family Day on Saturday and we certainly were in motion!  Over 1,000 visitors joined us for a full afternoon of activity. Several artisans were on hand helping the kids make decorated medallion necklaces, clay pinch pots and woven baskets in the Poarch tradition.

EV.NativeAM4blogTribal historian, Robert Thrower shared stories and showed Poarch artifacts to guests all afternoon. Through the objects he shared, he explained what life was like in the early days of the Tribe and some of their traditions.

In the field next to the Museum, the drumming group Medicine Tail played while members performed demonstrations of both Stomp Dancing and the elaborate Pow Wow Dances while the younger and more energetic attendees tried their hand at traditional Stick Ball, the predecessor of modern day lacrosse.

EV.NativeAM2blogIn the Rotunda, the premiere of a new photography exhibition Poarch: History in Motion was installed. Beautiful portraits by Karen Odyniec of tribal members were hung next to short stories about them with artifacts from Kerretv Cuko, the Poarch Band of Creek Indian Museum in Atmore.

 

EV.nativeAMERICAN-blogWe were delighted to partner with the Tribe again this year to present such a fun and informative day for the River Region, all of which was free.

Jill Barry
Deputy Director

 

Bazaar d’Art will feature ten works by Selma painter John Lapsley

Lapsley_Flower_Market_BLOGFor those interested in collecting work by Southern artists, this year’s Bazaar d’Art will present a very rare opportunity to acquire paintings by the Selma artist John Lapsley (1915–2005). Lapsley was an important Alabama painter/printmaker whose works date from the 1930s into the early part of the twenty-first century. The works being offered in the MMFA’s biennial silent auction reflect his passionate interest in the style of the French Post-Impressionists such as Edouard Vuillard (French, 1868–1940), Pierre Bonnard (French, 1867–1947), and the great French modernist Henri Matisse (1869–1944). His bright, colorful, and light-filled compositions were inspired by the style of these artists, however his subject matter was typically taken from his hometown in Selma, or the landscape and cultural environment of the American South.

Paintings by John Lapsley have graced the walls of central Alabama homes for many years; he was a prolific artist who exhibited widely during his later career. However, it is very unusual for ten works of this quality to be offered at one time. This opportunity has been made possible by a very generous donation from the Estate of Betty Baldwin, and by Nancy Buzard, both long-time Museum supporters. Betty’s nieces—Marcia Weese, Shirley Weese Young, and Kate Weese—joined with Nancy to make this wonderful gesture in support of the Lapsley_Sailboats_blogMuseum’s programs and mission in memory of their aunt, who passed away last year. Betty and Nancy were friends of the artist, and most of the works offered were acquired by them around the time they were painted. This circumstance makes this opportunity even more unusual, as when purchased on the secondary market, there are often questions regarding a work’s origin or its condition.

The works will go on view Saturday, February 21, at 10:00 A.M. and remain open for silent bidding until the Bazaar d’Art cocktail party on Thursday, March 5, beginning at 7:00 P.M. You may buy advance tickets at this link or call 334-240-4333 for more information.

Margaret Lynne Ausfeld
Curator of Art

Don’t Miss the Fifth Annual Artist Market

Randy_shoults_1136Just in time for the holiday season, 30 local and regional artists will showcase their outstanding works of art this coming weekend at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Art’s highly acclaimed Artist Market 2014. You won’t want to miss this opportunity to find one-of-a-kind, handmade gifts for everyone on your list.

The festivities kick off Friday, November 21, with a Preview Party from 5:30 to 8 P.M.

You can shop and get up close and personal with the artists while enjoying hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. The fun continues on Saturday, November 22, from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M. Shop early on either day to get the best selection of all the wonderful works that will be available.Store_jewelry.blog

 

This year’s featured special artist is Elayne Goodman of Columbus, Mississippi, a contemporary self-taught artist who will show her distinctive, brilliantly colored decorative objects. Other artists on hand will be potter Margaret Barber, stone craftsman Brooks Barrow, potter Dianne Benefield, book maker Robin Birdwell, leather artisan Pam Buwalda, painter Joan DiLaura, and mixed media artist Darrell Ezekiel. The showcased artworks include pottery, drawings, and paintings and a host of other media.CarolineW_Sayre_w

 

Store_artist.blogWhile you are here, feel free to stop by the Museum Store from 11 A.M. to 4 P.M. to shop for even more examples of artist-made works, or make a reservation for the special “Artist Market Edition” of our popular Saturday Brunch at Café M from 10 A.M. till 2 P.M.

Artist Market 2014 is sponsored by STIFEL investment services. For more information, call 240-4333 or go to this link on the website http://mmfa.org/visit/events/. We look forward to seeing you at Artist Market 2014.

 

Cynthia Milledge
Public Relations and Marketing Director

 

 

With African Art, the MMFA Welcomes a New Era in Collecting

EV.jazz.African.blogThe Museum celebrated a new collection and a new era in collecting with a series of events held between Thursday, October 23 and Sunday, October 26. The many participants over the three-day event were given a sense of the importance of the African acquisitions that are new to both the Museum and to the community.

On Thursday evening the Museum hosted a lecture by Professor Robin Poynor, a member of the faculty in the School of Art and Art History at the University of Florida. Professor Poynor discussed the roles playedEV.African.Poynor.blog by these newly acquired objects of African art in the lives of those who lived in traditional African societies. He showed many of the Museum’s woodcarvings, weavings, ceramics, and metal objects in the context of their use through photography depicting homes, communities, and public performances.   For the past year, Professor Poynor has served as the Museum’s consulting curator to select works of art for the collection, and to provide information and scholarship relative to their acquisition. He worked closely with the donors and with the Museum staff to create the exhibition Art for Life’s Sake: An African Collection for the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts.

EV.African.Dileep.blogThe weekend events also included a Friday lunchtime presentation for the Museum’s Collectors Society that featured the collector and donor of the African art acquired as a gift by the Museum—Dileep Mehta of Atlanta, Georgia. As a professor of finance, Dr. Mehta traveled extensively, and worked over a period of many years to build his collection of African materials. On Sunday, the Museum hosted a combination Family Day for African Art, a Jazz Jams featuring the Jazz students in the program at BTW, as well as a EV.African.BTWdance.blogperformance by the BTW Dance Theater, Out of Africa. There were hands-on activities in the studios, artist’s demonstrations, and tours of the new African collection for the public.

This exciting weekend of programs caps off a season of exploration for our staff, docents, and public as we learned more about the wonderful objects that have now found a home in Montgomery. We look forward to sharing them often with our audiences.EV.African.HomerJ.blog

Margaret Lynne Ausfeld
Curator of Art

View highlights of the African Family Day here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAS-stIY540&list=UUr4m6_kMNuu97FChx2L00sA

 

 

 

MMFA Family Member says “Goodbye”

Kay_741blogIf you ever walked into The Museum Store in the last five years, chances are Kay Jacoby’s voice and smile greeted you. Customers say Kay truly knows how to combine superior customer service with a touch of wit-so much so, they feel compelled to come back. She has seen the Museum Store evolve from a typical museum gift shop environment to an amazing experience for artists and customers alike. Jacoby says, “I know just about every artist in here.”

She walked into the store that displays handcrafted artwork of regional and local artists in August 2009. As she embarked on this new career, she was also trying to get through grieving the death of her mom. Jacoby says, “I truly appreciate the support and friendships made.” As you can imagine the relationships created came through countless conversations, not only with shoppers, but the artists too. Jacoby says, “I know just about every artist in here. My favorite part about working in the store is displaying the art.”

All those moments of working with artists and displaying their art turned into a colorful display of emotion as she said her final goodbyes to members of her MMFA family, Tuesday, September 30th. The staff gathered to bid farewell to Kay over cake and coffee in the Museum’s Café M. Yes, the person who operated The Museum Store countless hours and days is moving to make some long-sought changes in her life as she goes home to create more artwork of her own.

On this occasion, Kay received quotes from her colleagues who have grown accustomed to seeing her painted plaques with funny and encouraging quotes in the Museum store. Kay_Tisha_38blogHere are words some of the staff left her with. “We don’t remember days, we remember moments,” “Love is a flower, you have to let it grow,” “Think differently,” and “If you’re going through hell, keep going,”

Kay_0041blogAll read aloud by staff members that Tuesday afternoon, these quotes seemed to echo their heartfelt sentiments: she will be greatly missed. As she leaves, she passes the torch to the newly hired, Ward Chesser, but don’t think you have seen the last of Kay Jacoby. Jacoby says, “I will be back for Artist Market and other events.”

Cynthia Milledge
Director of Marketing and Public Relations

 

Littleton Unveiled

Littleton2_blogOn the evening of Tuesday, August 26, the MMFA officially ‘unveiled’ one of our newest acquisitions, Harvey Littleton’s Orange Triple Movement, 1983 (see blog post of July 7, 2014).

Joan Loeb, Chairperson of the Decorative Arts Committee, who was instrumental in bringing this historic and significant sculpture to the MMFA kicked off the event, and following the unveiling, Maurine Littleton shared her insights about the work. As a renowned gallery dealer and as the daughter of the artist, Maurine revealed how Harvey Littleton created the work, while describing her father’s relationship to many of the other artists featured in the MMFA’s collection of American studio glass including Dale Chihuly, Flora Mace and Joey Kirkpatrick, and Dante Marioni.

Littleton1_blogMaurine conveyed how to tell the difference between the different glass types utilized by artists—commercially available or hand-made—and why artists use various colors together, primarily because of similar melting temperatures. She also talked about the beginnings of the American Studio Glass movement, emphasizing the congenial nature of that artistic community. She believes that the sharing of ideas and techniques among artists helped the movement to blossom and grow. This is especially apparent in the early creation of glass programs at universities around the country—many started by students of her father. While these artists influenced each other, there was also a spirit of innovation that spurred so much creative experimentation, allowing artists to develop individual styles. Certainly, everyone could see Harvey Littleton’s extraordinary style and technique in Orange Triple Movement.

Jennifer Jankauskas
Curator of Art

 

Military Open House 2014

MOH76_blogMajor Brian Chatman family’s first visit to the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts turned out to be impressive.
Chatman said, “We really appreciate you guys providing the food, the band is amazing and the kid’s zone, my daughter had a blast.”

Chatman, his wife Georgene, and their 16-month-old daughter Raelyn, were among the 423 people taking part in this year’s Military Open House. This is their first full month in Montgomery. They moved here in July from Los Angeles. Georgene Chatman said, “It’s introducing us to activities we can do throughout the day as a family and explore with other military families. It’s also introduced us to culture and art. This has been great.”

Like the Chatmans, many other military men and women took advantage of what this family centered event had to offer. During this two hour period, they got to take a personal tour of the Museum’s exhibits, dress up in costumes and take pictures at a photo booth, and get their hands dirty during clay pottery and paper quilt-making activities.MOH65_blog  Chatman said, “It’s a great introduction to the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts.”  His wife Georgene added, “It helps us get connected with other military families.”

Not all members of the armed forces are active duty, some are reservists or retired like James Simpson. MOH85_blogWe found Simpson, his wife Cynthia, and son Desmond sharing family time doing an art project together. James Simpson said, “Not only do I get to take my family to a quality event, I also get to be around comrades, and sometimes I get to run into people from Maxwell Air Force Base that I was stationed with and haven’t seen in a long time.” Cynthia Simpson said, “It keeps our family connected. It helps us appreciate each other and enjoy this special time together. Their son, Desmond Simpson said, “It’s just fun to me.”

We found other guests like Brigadier General Robert Thomas bonding with colleagues while dining on a meal catered by Wintzell’s Oyster House. This is his third year bringing his family. Brigadier General Thomas said, “I think it allows the men and women at the base to feel like a part of the community.”

The fun doesn’t stop with the activities and food. Music filled the air in the Lowder Gallery with tunes being belted out by the voices of members of the LoFiLoungers band. Many said this helped end their evening on a good note.

MOH72_blogBrigadier General Thomas said, “My favorite part is looking at the paintings with my kids and discussing what is their favorite painting. I ask them ‘what do you like about this one’ and I think it’s a fun memory for them.”

This was the 19th year for the MMFA’s Military Open House. We look forward to saluting the Chatman, Simpson, and Thomas families for their dedication and service to our country again next summer.

Cynthia Milledge
Director of Marketing and Public Relations

View highlights of this year’s Military Open House at  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXXGVH_41T4&feature=youtu.be.

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